CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

* In long withheld July 4, 2000 Email to former assistant Mara Linscott, Bruce Ivins is revealed to be closet scrabble player

Posted by Lew Weinstein on January 19, 2018

IvinstheScrabblePlayer

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3 Responses to “* In long withheld July 4, 2000 Email to former assistant Mara Linscott, Bruce Ivins is revealed to be closet scrabble player”

  1. DXer said

    David Hardy is also withholding a March 4, 2001 email that is especially dark and troubling. For any FOIA requestor, the adage “be careful what you wish for” comes to mind. Just as with the fellow who forged his PhD certificate and the fellow who forged a signature on a will, there are factual underpinnings of an Ivins Theory that make Ivins look really bad and make an Ivins Theory look very reasonable.

    So the key short strokes to focus on — litigation-wise — are the emails from September 2001 and October 2001. For example, September 15, 21 and 26.

    The key issue is to have a transparency that allows us to see how Ivins was spending his time during the period that the FBI speculates Ivins was preparing a deadly anthrax to mail.

  2. DXer said

    The FBI scientist did not appreciate that his hours analysis was garbage for several reasons — to include that the challenges and shifted from aerosol challenges in 1412 to injection challenges in 1425.

    And looking only at 1425, he missed the hours Ivins was spending, for example in the summer of 2000.

    He wrote Mara Linscott, his former assistant:

    “Spending every possible moment here at work, including holidays, weekends and evenings (several times lately I’ve had to come in at night and work into the wee hours of the morning – no fun!) just to save BioPort’s skin – UGH!”

    Now go ahead. Rewind the tape. Remember how US Attorney Taylor’s based his Ivins Theory on three reasons. One was the drying equipment that, it turned out, was not available for him to use in the B3.

    Another was Ivins never worked weekends and evenings — but suddenly inexplicable was. (No mention at all of the numerous small animal experiments).

    What is the name of the DOJ/FBI employee who asked that this email be pulled from production? It was very wrong to cull it in light of the FBI’s Ivins Theory:

    “Spending every possible moment here at work, including holidays, weekends and evenings (several times lately I’ve had to come in at night and work into the wee hours of the morning – no fun!) just to save BioPort’s skin – UGH!”

    R. Scott Decker, in his book, admits that they had a complete set of Ivins’ emails in their office.

    So either they did not master the documents or the FBI has played — and is continuing to play — a game of hide the ball.

    All the evidence points to it being a combination of both.

    But we don’t expect public servants to be all-knowing and always right. (In our own lives, we certainly are not). We only ask that they not selectively present evidence while failing to comply with the Freedom of Information Act.

    Scott Decker: Don’t just pay lip service to the rule of law. Live it — even if it might reveal that you were mistaken in your conclusions in a career-making (or breaking) true crime case. Even if it might cause you to make less money selling your $38 book.

    Encourage your former colleagues to cough up the documents.

    Give to Ken what y’all gave to David Willman.

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