CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

* If Jdey Was Detained (And Released) At Same Time As Moussaoui Was Detained, Was Moussaoui In Touch With Him Or In His Presence During The Week Before The Arrest?

Posted by Lew Weinstein on February 1, 2012

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6 Responses to “* If Jdey Was Detained (And Released) At Same Time As Moussaoui Was Detained, Was Moussaoui In Touch With Him Or In His Presence During The Week Before The Arrest?”

  1. DXer said

    There still is no publicly available evidence that Moussaoui was in touch with Jdey.

  2. DXer said

    The DOJ and FBI have been sued in Federal District Court for documents bearing on this question. Wouldn’t it FURTHER law enforcement purpose, rather than impede it, to disclose whether Moussaoui was in touch with Jdey during the week before his arrest?

    http://www.amerithrax.wordpress.com

  3. DXer said

    The Spring Hlll Suites call (that is located near the airport) very likely was to one of his instructors such as Clancy Prevost, who collected the $5 million reward.

    http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2003/08/28_zdechlikm_wellstonesettle/

    “His name is Clancy Prevost. He is sixty-eight years old, a retired pilot for Northwest Airlines, a lapsed Catholic, and a recovering alcoholic. He shakes his head as he recalls his story publicly for the first time.

    The morning of August 13, 2001, was warm and humid, the Minnesota summer nearing its peak. Clancy Prevost left his room at the Spring Hill Suites, his local lodging when he commutes from the East Coast. He jumped on the hotel shuttle and headed for the nearby offices of the Pan-Am International Flight Academy. He wore a blue polo shirt, khakis, and red Converse sneakers.

    Moussaoui’s demeanor may have helped him go unnoticed during the five and a half months leading up to his arrest. He arrived in Chicago from London on February 23 and declared at least thirty-five thousand dollars in cash on his customs form.

    He traveled to Oklahoma City, and later to Minnesota.

    Along the way, Moussaoui bought knives and flight-training videos and inquired about starting a crop-dusting company. Not once did he draw the attention of authorities. Not even when he walked into the Pan Am flight school, counted out sixty-eight one-hundred dollar bills, and signed up to learn how to fly a 747. His luck ended the day he met his flight instructor, Clancy Prevost.

    At first glance, Moussaoui was the kind of client Prevost had seen before: a wealthy civilian with no ties to the airline industry who wanted to learn how to fly a commercial jetliner. One might be surprised to learn how many “vanity clients” come to flight school, men of means with lots of free time, whose ultimate hope is apparently to impress women with a 747-type rating—bragging rights worth thousands of dollars. (Normally, most of Pan Am’s students are working, commercial pilots who are training to upgrade their ratings from smaller passenger jets. Maybe two or three vanity students turn up each year.) But that first day, Moussaoui would prove unlike any other student Prevost had known.

    ***

    Prevost had Wednesday off. Having finished two days of what passed for ground school, his time with Moussaoui was effectively over. That morning he got a call from his office. The FBI wanted to talk with him.

    At 1:00 p.m. Prevost met with an FBI agent and an Immigration and Naturalization Service agent in the commons room of his hotel. Prevost had done all the footwork for them.

    “Where does Moussaoui stay?” they asked.

    “At the Residence Inn.”

    “How does he get over to NATCO?”

    “He comes in a Subaru with a silver paint job, four-door sedan, and the license plate is green and white and the last three numbers are 686.”

    “Who drives him?”

    “A guy with black hair. He looks Oriental from the back but he’s dark complected and has black hair.”

    The interview lasted less than twenty minutes. Prevost felt enormous relief. “OK, now we’ve told the FBI,” he remembers thinking. “It’s out of my hands. I’ve done as much as I can.”

    ***

    Prevost’s next day at work was Thursday. He had a four-hour LOFT scheduled overnight from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. (Pan Am often used the simulators during off hours.) Another instructor, Rich Lamb, was scheduled to give Moussaoui LOFT training at 6 p.m. (Prevost had been charged only with Moussaoui’s ground school course work.)

    Prevost left a message for another new student to show up at 5 p.m. On the chance that someone canceled, they could fill the 6 p.m. slot, be done by 10 p.m., and avoid the overnight shift. Prevost and Lamb waited in the lobby for Moussaoui and the other student.

    Dana Wilson, one of the schedulers, came up and told Lamb, “Your sim’s canceled.”

    Prevost asked, “What happened to Zach?” Two days of intrigue ended with a matter-of-fact statement.

    “They led him away,” she said

    ***

    For the next twenty-eight days, Prevost entertained his AA buddies with the anecdote of the odd Middle Easterner who disappeared into the hands of government agents. It made a good story. Over coffee, someone would prod him to repeat the account, the story that always ended with the same deliberate punch line, “They led him away.”

    On the morning of September 11th, Prevost was sitting at home. The phone rang. It was his daughter Annie. In a scene that was being repeated across the country, she said, “Dad, they’re crashing airplanes into the Trade Center.”

    ***

    In 1998, Moussaoui trained at an al-Qaida-affiliated camp in Afghanistan. In the months before his arrest, Moussaoui pursued training at the same Norman, Oklahoma, flight school attended by Mohammed Atta …(I add: Oklahoma hotel manager sees Atta with McVey)

    ***

    Moussaoui spent twenty-five weeks in the U.S.; he spent only two days with Prevost. So why did Clancy Prevost see so clearly what no one else seemed able to?

    Al Johnson, a program manager at Pan Am and the man who introduced Prevost to Moussaoui, says, “Clancy is just the type of a guy who would be curious about what this guy wants to do with an airplane. He isn’t there just to walk in and start training a guy in the morning because the guy wants to see if he can fly a 747. I’m not sure that anybody else would have been as curious as Clancy, or asked the right questions.”

    After September 11th, Alan McHale (I add: who prior wanted to let the issue go in regard to suspicions Prevost had) personally thanked Prevost for his actions.

    ***

    Prevost is an atheist with the intellectual energy of a college freshman, the moral clarity of a monk, and the wonder of a man awakened for the first time at the age of fifty-six from a life of drinking.

    “Live your life according to principles, not people,” he says, head shaking slightly, eyes wide, grinning at the beauty of the statement. Prevost can smell B.S. a mile away. He smelled it all over Zacarias Moussaoui a month before September 11th

    • DXer said

      In addition to Domino’s Pizza, during the week before his arrest Moussaoui charged to his hotel bill one call to SpringHill Suites near the Minneapolis Airport and one call to the Islamic Institute of Minnesota in Saint Paul, MN.

      Elzahabi was an Al Qaeda operative who knew all the wrong people and had beelined for St. Paul when he entered the country from fighting in Bosnia in mid-August 2001. It has not been reported exactly when Elzahabi arrives in Minneapolis, but he applies for a commercial driver’s license on August 23, 2001. He is fingerprinted for a criminal background check at that time

      http://www.historycommons.org/entity.jsp?entity=mohamad_kamal_elzahabi

      Did he know Zacarias? Was Zacarias Moussaoui in touch with him? Who did Zacarias Moussaoui contact using his Ramada Residence Inn telephone?

      Was Moussaoui in touch with Jdey? Was Jdey in St. Paul? Was Moussaoui in touch with Elzahabi? Did Elzahabi know Jdey?

      I left a message for Agent Samit a couple days ago but haven’t had a chance to see if he responded.

      Elzahabi was on a list of possible or suspected terrorists” circulated to foreign airlines and banks shortly after 9/11. [FOX NEWS, 6/26/2004; STAR-TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS), 6/30/2004]

      In 2004 he was arrested. The US was motivated and even bugged his prison cell.

      As journalist Colin Frieze explains:

      “In the U.S. view, the Elzahabi case is about radios the way the 1930s prosecution of gangster Al Capone was about tax evasion. Minnesota court records show that, in 2004, agents rushed to arrest Mr. Elzahabi because they knew him as an Afghan-trained sniper and had heard he was moving north.”

      “There was concern that he, like others in his specialty, in his trade, might use Canada as a base to attack the United States,” FBI agent Harry Samit testified in Minneapolis last year.

      Elzahabi came from Chechnya in mid-August. 2001 He was fresh from fighting with Ibn Khattab, who was Bin Laden’s confidante in WMD aspirations. He went straight for Minneapolis, rather than Boston or New York City where he had previously lived. He applied for a job as a school bus driver on September 11, 2001. He did not start work until after the mailings. Elzahabi lived at a small community center in Dinkytown near the University of Minnesota. Why did Elzahabi go to Minneapolis? His prosecution was surrounded in secrecy.

      Elzahabi reentered the US in mid-August 2001 and went to Minneapolis (the month Zacarias was arrested in Minneapolis at the Ramada Residence inn on August 16, 2001 (judging from the interview form, apparently he was arrested and/or transported by Agents Noordmann and Rapp). Did Mousaoui know Elzahabi? Elzahabi was held for three months under a material witness warrant beginning May 2004. When the federal district court judge lost his patience (because the government had not presented him to a grand jury), the government brought charges relating to making false statement to investigators. US Attorney Heffelfinger wouldn’t comment on whether Elzahabi’s case had any connection to Moussaoui.

      Elzahabi trained 4 years in Khalden in the early 1990s. He came back to the US for medical care after being shot. Elzahabi lived in a house near the University of Minnesota that was also home to a mosque. He was being “trashed” (G-Men were going through his garbage) What mosque did Zacarias attend while in Minneapolis? They “trashed” Elzahabi for months before arresting him — or was it for a matter of years? These perps who don’t just assume the worst and flee are incredibly stupid. Where was Elzahabi on the dates of mailing? I had thought that applied for a job with a school bus company on September 11 but then I just read that he reportedly travelled to Boston on September 7 was carrying around $30,000. So I am presently uncertain of his whereabouts in late September and early October 2001.

      Elzahabi did not begin work until at least about October 17, 2001, according to a published report quoting a named First Student spokesperson. He reportedly was dismissed in January 2002 after missing a few days of work. Elzahabi was granted a hazmat truck license in January 2002 by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Department. His license to drive a bus was cancelled in February 2002 for reasons that are not known.

      In January of 2002, the RCMP raided Montreal residences associated with his Elzhabi’s brother, Abdelrahman – who split time between New York and Montreal – were searched.

      Elzahabi was questioned for two weeks at a Marriott in downtown Minneapolis, a few blocks away from FBI offices. Elzahabi said he had long renounced his extremist interests — he had once taught sniping in Afghanistan and associated with Al Qaeda leaders — and was willing to help the FBI. D Did Elzahabi know Jdey from Montreal?

      Journalist Colin Frieze explains:

      “In the early 1990s, he met men who would go on to become notorious terrorists, even the eventual mastermind of the 9/11 attacks, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed. But later, when Mr. Elzahabi was asked whether he was part of al-Qaeda, “he would frequently tell us that he was not a member,” Agent Samit testified.”

      Moussaoui trained at the Khalden camp in or about April 1998, Zubaydah had asked Elzahabi to be a trainer there (though Elzahabi says he declined, and says he went to Bosnia to fight instead). (At the time of Zubaydah’s request, Elzahabi had been living in NYC providing logistical support (shipping radios) to the Afghan fighters. Zubaydah is one of the Al Qaeda planners that Zacarias wants to testify at his trial. Zacarias said in a March 2002 motion: “Abu Zubaydah must talk to the world about September 11.” According to the statement of facts filed in support of his plea, Moussaoui managed an al Qaeda guesthouse in Kandahar. This was a position of high respect within al Qaeda. Moussaoui communicated directly with Bin Laden and Abu Hafs al Masri.

      Elzahabi in the 1990s lived in Boston with Al-Marabh and Hijazi are roommates for at least two months. While they work together driving taxis, Hijazi is saving his earnings to spend on bomb plots and is working on an al-Qaeda plot to attack a US warship. That plot will develop into the attack on the USS Cole in 2000. (As for the CIA and FBI dropping the ball in tracking key hijackers al-Hazmi and Al-Mihdhar in inextricably linked to missteps relating to the leads they were pursuing with respect to Cole.)

      According to the complaint unsealed in US District Court in Minneapolis, Elzahabi lied about the extent of his relationship with Hijazi. When questioned in April 2004 by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force, Elzahabi “denied knowing him very well.” The complaint alleged that Elzahabi helped obtain a driver’s license for Hijazi. Elzahabi served as the sponsor for the application and Hijazi used Elzahabi’s Everett address for mailing. The Boston Globe reports that one friend, who did not want to be identified, says “that Elzahabi had taken a used mattress from his apartment in Everett and brought it to Hijazi’s apartment in Malden.”

      To review: Elzahabi knew Khalid Mohammed, Zubaydah, and even Zarqawi. He lived in Queens in NYC in 1995-1997, where he allegedly shipped portable field radios to Afghan fighters. Then he worked in Boston with Al-Marabh and Hijazi in 1997-1998. Canadian journalist Colin Frieze explains: “While on the mend, he worked in the mechanic’s business, DAR, run by his brother in New York. After that, he drove a cab in Boston. Three other former mujahedeen worked at the same company. One ended up jailed for an al-Qaeda bomb plot in Jordan. Another was killed trying to lead a Sunni insurrection in Lebanon. The other is jailed in Syria.” In 1998, Zubaydah asked him to come back to work as a trainer (though he actually ended up in Lebanon). Before 9/11, he fought under Khattab the Arab Chechnya fighter who was killed in 2002 by a poison letter. He travelled to Minneapolis in mid-August 2001 and went straight to St. Paul as did Zacarias Moussaoui. I believe a documents shows he applied for a job as a driver for a school bus company job on 9/11. Then he was fired on January 18, 2002 for missing a few days of work.

      A couple key questions occur to me: Did he know Zacarias? Was Zacarias Moussaoui in touch with him? Did Elzahabi know Jdey? Was Jdey in Minneapolis in mid-August 2001 and in touch with Elzahabi?
      I left a message for Agent Samit a couple days ago but haven’t had a chance to see if he responded.

      Can Agent Samit tell us whether Jdey was detained at the same time as Moussaoui? Can Agent Nordmann or Agent Rapp?

      Can he tell us whether Moussaoui was in touch with Elzahabi in St. Paul in Minnesota? Is that why he beelined for St. Paul upon reentering the country?

      El Paso Times, “Suspected operative for al-Qaida held at center in El Paso”, December 31, 2008

      Colin Freeze (2009-09-12). “Jailed Arab details ties to tortured Canadians”. Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on 2009-09-14.

      USA v. Mohamad Kamal Elzahabi, “Position of the United States with Respect to Sentencing”, March 14, 2008

      Vandenover, FBI Special Agent Kiann. “Affidavit, USA v. Mohamad Kamal Elzahabi”, June 28, 2004

      Kurkjian, Stephen. Boston Globe, “FBI probes sleeper cell possibility”, June 27, 2004

      Kurkjian, Stephen. Boston Globe, “Terrorism probe tracks ex-cabdrivers”, February 5, 2001

      Murphy, Shelley. Boston Globe, “Cab Driver charged with lying to FBI”, June 26, 2004

      Freeze, Colin. Globe and Mail, “Torture, radios and why the US won’t let go”, March 17, 2007

      Herridge, Catherine. Fox News, “Zarqawi associate charged”, June 26, 2004

      Freeze, Colin (October 20, 2007). “Why U.S. won’t remove Arar from no-fly list”. The Globe and Mail.

      Gordon, Greg. Minneapolis Star-Tribune, “Minneapolis terror suspect licensed to haul hazardous freight”, June 30, 2004

      Magill, Frank J. Department of Justice News Release, “Elzahabi sentenced to time served for possessing fraudulent immigration documents”, March 14, 2008

      Louwagie, Pam. Minneapolis Star-Tribune, “Minneapolis terrorism suspect had sham marriage, authorities say”, December 8, 2005

      USA v. Mohamad Kamal Elzahabi, Superseding Indictment, December 6, 2005

      Duffy, Andrew. Ottawa Citizen, Almalki linked to US terror trial, March 14, 2007

      • DXer said

        Al-Marabh is an interesting fellow and had other interesting associates. For example, he had one associate who was arrested in 2001 for skimming at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Had Moussaoui called him? When Elmaroudi was arrested, he gave “New Brunswick” NJ as his fake address.

        When he was arrested in 2002, Abdel-Ilah Elmardoudi’s fake ID gave the address of “New Branswick.” New Brunswick was 4 miles from Franklin Park, the place in New Jersey used on the fictitious return address in the anthrax mailings. He was carrying over $80,000 in cash — and nervously bit his lip in November 2002 as DEA agents searched the greyhound bus transiting North Carolina on the way from New York City to Houston. In a trial in Detroit, he would be convicted of being part of a cell supporting terrorists, but his conviction was later reversed on the grounds of prosecutorial misconduct. He had lived in Detroit with the two men who were with the Egyptian scientist in Canton, Ohio public library in May and June 2001 researching anthrax and other pathogens.

        In August 2006, three weeks after a federal district judge in Minneapolis dismissed charges against Abdel-Ilah Elmardoudi, a federal grand jury indicted him again for the same crimes. Elmardoudi, age 40, of Minneapolis, was arrested and indicted in 2001 for stealing telephone calling card numbers from travelers at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport by looking over their shoulder while the made a call. Elmardoudi was ordered to remain in a halfway house called 180 degrees in Minneapolis pending his trial. Another resident at the house has described Elmardoui as somewhat profane and contemptuous of the others in the house — calling them ignorant in Arabic. He did not at all seem like a religious zealot or terrorist. Elmardoudi fled the jurisdiction and went to Michigan, which prompted federal prosecutors to add escape charges to his list of alleged crimes. In late 2002,

        When Elmardoudi was apprehended on a bus going from New York City to Houston while transiting North Carolina, he was taken to Detroit, Michigan on the terrorism charges, where he stood trial, was convicted, and jailed. He was convicted along with Moroccan Karem Koubriti of conspiring to support Islamic extremists plotting attacks in the United States and the Middle East. That case had begun with a raid on a Detroit apartment just a week after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks when the FBI raided an apartment where Al Qaeda operative Nabil Al-Marabh had been staying. Al-Marabh had contacted with Atta, Al-Shehhi and two other hijackers. The former Boston cab driver once distributed up to $200,000 between Afghanistan training camps. Abdel-Ilah Elmardoudi, then 37, and Karim Koubriti, 24, were found guilty of conspiracy to provide material support or resources to terrorists. Prosecutors had alleged the four men worked as a sleeper cell and conspired to help terrorists by raising money and producing false documents. The government had claimed that Elmardoudi was the leader of the alleged cell. Prosecutors said their plot was hatched before they arrived in the United States in the late 1990s and 2000. Prosecutors relied upon a videotape and sketches found in the apartment raid showed potential targets including Las Vegas and Disneyland, and U.S. military installations in Turkey and Jordan. The convictions was reversed upon the finding by a DOJ inquiry into alleged prosecutorial misconduct involving the withholding of evidence. The government had claimed the men were radical followers of the Salafist theology, based in part on audio tapes found in the raid, but defense experts said the tapes merely promote mainstream Salafi ideology, which urges on strict adherence to Islamic traditions. The defendants claimed that the day planner once belonged to a now-dead mentally ill man who liked to doodle. They said a video depicting scenes of Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., and the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, was an innocuous travelogue. The prosecution’s star witness was Youssef Hmimssa, who later lived with Elmardoudi — defendants was an admitted scam artist who lived briefly with some of the defendants and was lying to help himself. In his testimony, Hmimssa claimed that Elmardoudi told him about the possibility of attacks on the United States one month before the Sept. 11 hijackings.

        Elmardoudi’s conviction for supporting terrorism was reversed due to the prosecution’s withholding of evidence said to cast doubt on who made the drawings and on the credibility of Hmimssa’s testimony. The charges were dismissed in the fall of 2004 pursuant to the joint request of Elmardoudi and the United States. Then, on August 2, 2006, a federal district court judge in Minnesota dismissed the long-standing charges in Minnesota, citing a violation of Elmardoudi’s right to a speedy trial. The court reasoned that at least seventy-four “countable” days had elapsed — the government needed to have tried Elmardoudi within seventy days. The court noted, however, that the charges against Elmardoudi could be re-filed at a later date. Within three weeks, Elmardoudi was again indicted on three counts of access device fraud and one count of escape.

        The complaint alleged that in November of 2000, an investigator for AT&T began looking into the unauthorized use of calling cards after the company received numerous complaints. The AT&T investigation revealed a scheme in which someone would engage in “shoulder surfing” to steal calling-card numbers from people at the airport by positioning himself in such a way that he either saw the numbers on the cards or could see the numbers entered on the phone pad. No binoculars or other hardware was used. Once the shoulder surfer confirmed that the codes worked, he supplied them to overseas’ callers, who would use them until they were canceled upon complaint of the ustomer.

        AT&T’s computer software indicated that the “surfer,” later identified as Elmardoudi, would get to the airport around noon and typically would stay for eight hours. AT&T contacted the U.S. Secret Service. After two days of surveillance by the Secret Service, Elmardoudi was arrested. He had at least fifteen unauthorized calling-card numbers in his possession. Authorities found hundreds more at his apartment. Over the period of a year, access codes stolen by Elmardoudi were used to make more than $745,000 in unauthorized long-distance and international phone calls. Calls were made to various locations in the United States from telephones in Egypt, Kuwait, East Africa, the Philippines, the Middle East, and the Balkans.

    • DXer said

      Elzahabi: Another Boston Cabby Who Got Around

      Al-Marabh was also friendly with one-time Boston cab driver Mohamad Kamal Elzahabi. The Boston office of the FBI probed whether the Boston cab drivers may have been part of a cell supporting Al Qaeda terrorist activities. Elzahabi was charged in Minnesota with lying to the FBI and shipping communications equipment to Pakistan. Elzahabi lived in the Boston area between 1997 and 1999, driving a cab leased from the Boston Cab Co., the same company that al-Marabh and Hijazi leased from. Elzahabi lived in apartments in Everett. Like al-Marabh, he attended Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan during the 1980s. According to an account provided to the Boston Globe, Elzahabi fought together with al-Marabh against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Parrot-ice was Nabil al-Marabh’s favorite drink in 9/2001 according to owner of 7 Days Liquor Store, his employer for a week at the Chicago area liquore store. The drink compay’s slogan was “Escape to Parrot-ice.”

      Elzahabi reentered the US in mid-August 2001 and went to Minneapolis (the month Zacarias was arrested in Minneapolis). Like Al-Marabh, Elzahabi allegedly acted as a cash courier for jihadist groups prior to his arrival in the US in the summer of 2001. Elzahabi trained 4 years in Khalden in the early 1990s. He came back to the US for medical care after being shot and treated by an Egyptian doctor in Connecticut. After reentering the US in August 2001, he reportedly also occasionally turned up in Montreal before his arrest. He allegedly knew three jihadists who had been rendered to Syria. Wherewas Elzahabi on the dates of mailing? I believe he applied for a job with a school bus company on September 11. Elzahabi did not begin work until at least about October 17, 2001, according to a published report quoting a named First Student spokesperson. He reportedly was dismissed in January 2002 after missing a few days of work. Elzahabi was granted a hazmat truck license in January 2002 by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Department. His license to drive a bus was cancelled in February 2002.

      As the FBI secretly watched him, Elzhahabi became friendly with a police officer. When he wanted to go to Canada, he asked the officer about the background checks involved. The officer told him he was on a terrorism watch list. Minneapolis police Sgt. Andy Smith, a member of the joint terrorism task force with the FBI, suggested to Elzahabi that they talk to a buddy of Smith’s in the FBI about it. FBI then questioned him two weeks before arresting him. On April 16, 2004, they first met on a dark street along the river. Agents told Elzahabi they needed people like him to help them — and he agreed. He said he had long ago abandoned his extremist views. Agents questioned him in the living room of his hotel suite, while working out next to him in the gym, at lunch and dinner. Elzahabi flunked two polygraphs. The machine indicating deception when he was asked about plans to attack the United States. Agents frequently reminded that his statements were voluntary. When he said he had enough with the questioning, they arrested him.

      A Lebanese national, he had paid a Houston woman to marry him so he could be a permanent resident alien. He divorced in 1988. He first traveled to Afghanistan in 1988, entering the country through Pakistan. At the camp in 1988 and 1989, he knew Al-Zarqawi. He knew Raed Hijazi, later convicted in Jordan for his part in a millennium bombing plot targeting tourists. He also knew Bassam Kanj, who was killed by Lebanese troops in 2000 while leading a coup attempt aimed at installing a fundamentalist Islamic government. Both Hijazi and Kanj would work with him at the same Boston cab company, as would a man named Derwish, the Buffalo, NY Al Qaeda operative who recruited some young local Yemeni men there. According to the complaint unsealed in US District Court in Minneapolis, Elzahabi lied about the extent of his relationship with Hijazi. When questioned in April 2004 by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force, Elzahabi “denied knowing him very well.” The complaint alleged that Elzahabi helped obtain a driver’s license for Hijazi. Elzahabi served as the sponsor for the application and Hijazi used Elzahabi’s Everett address for mailing. The Boston Globe reports that one friend says that Elzahabi had taken a used mattress from his apartment and brought it to Hijazi’s apartment in Malden.

      The Boston Globe reports that the friend from Everett says that Elzahabi also had become friends with yet another Boston cab driver, Kanj, when both were fighting against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Elzahabi knew Khalid Mohammed, Zubaydah, and even Zarqawi. He lived in Queens in NYC in 1995-1997, where he allegedly shipped portable field radios to Afghan fighters. Then he worked in Boston with Al-Marabh and Hijazi in 1997-1998. In 1998, Zubaydah asked him to come back to work as a trainer (though he actually ended up in Lebanon). Before 9/11, he fought under Ibn Khattab, the Arab Chechnya fighter who was killed in 2002 by a poison letter. He travelled to Minneapolis in mid-August 2001 as did Zacarias Moussaoui. He applied for a job as a driver for a school bus company job on 9/11. Then he was fired on January 18, 2002 for missing a few days of work.

      In August 2007, Elzahabi was tried and convicted for immigration fraud. Soon after he came to the US on a student visa in 1984, his wife-to-be danced at the Pink Pussy Cat club. He had met her in his apartment building. He promised to pay her $5,000 to marry him. According to an FBI affidavit, Elzahabi acknowledged over 17 days of interviews that he had attended a jihad training camp, fought as a jihadist sniper in Afghanistan from about 1991-1995, and had connections to high-ranking Al Qaeda members. Government officials allege that just months after he came to the U.S., Elzahabi and the woman were married. The government alleges the couple never lived together, never exchanged rings and never went on a honeymoon. According to court records, he said he shot and killed a bulldozer driver while fighting with Chechen rebels. “We think this is a death-penalty case,” Elzahabi’s defense lawyer told the Judge, given the possibility of deportation.

      In connection with a related Minneapolis case involving a man named Warsame, court documents allege that Warsame trained at two Al-Qaida camps for several months. At the second camp, he met Bin Laden and attended Bin Laden’s lectures and sat next to him on the floor at a meal. Prosecutors allege that Warsame wanted to bring his wife and daughter to Afghanistan but Al Qaeda leaders told him instead that they would pay for him to go back home. Al Qaeda bought him an airline ticket and gave him $1,700.

      What about Warsame. Did he know Jdey? Did he know Elzahabi?

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