CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

* CASE CLOSED is Lew Weinstein’s novel which explores possible alternatives to the unsupported conclusions of the FBI’s “botched” investigation of the 2001 anthrax attacks … some readers say that certain aspects of Lew’s story are more plausible than the FBI’s publicly asserted case against Dr. Ivins … click below to read Lew’s opening scene … and learn what readers have to say about CASE CLOSED

Posted by Lew Weinstein on June 17, 2011

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CASE CLOSED is not just a good book, but an important one. Author Lew Weinstein explains that he did not find the FBI’s stunningly abrupt conclusion to the nearly 7 year old Anthrax investigation in 2008 in any way convincing.  This novel is the result. 

  • My biggest problem with CASE CLOSED is it is too believable. I would not be at all surprised if Lewis Weinstein’s fictionalized novel about the FBI’s anthrax investigation turned out to be more truth than fiction. 

more reader comments about CASE CLOSED at …

https://caseclosedbylewweinstein.wordpress.com/case-closed-reader-comments/

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read the opening scene of CASE CLOSED …

https://caseclosedbylewweinstein.wordpress.com/case-closed-chapter-one/

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* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

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for a FREE review copy of CASE CLOSED send your request to … 

caseclosedbylewweinstein@gmail.com


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6 Responses to “* CASE CLOSED is Lew Weinstein’s novel which explores possible alternatives to the unsupported conclusions of the FBI’s “botched” investigation of the 2001 anthrax attacks … some readers say that certain aspects of Lew’s story are more plausible than the FBI’s publicly asserted case against Dr. Ivins … click below to read Lew’s opening scene … and learn what readers have to say about CASE CLOSED”

  1. DXer said

    Fox is quoting the defense counsel mocking the FBI. But they are doing exactly what you would hope that they would do at least with respect to the ground penetrating radar. I wouldn’t necessarily have expected to be rolled out on the first search relating to the Conn. lead. If it hasn’t already been rolled out on this gravel pit on Abena Shores in Belgrade Lakes, ME, that would be a shame.

    I discussed ground penetrating radar last November:

    “And I hope she [the US Attorney] gets in the spirit of the treasure hunt, though, and takes ground penetrating radar to the gravel pit down the road from Joe Murray’s old summer home at Lake Belgrade. It’s not often you can play Nancy Drew and get paid for it.”

    “This is nonsense,” McGuigan said. “This is the FBI. Are you trying to tell me they missed something the first time? They’re trying to find $500 million of stolen artwork. … All they’re going to find is night crawlers.”

    Now as to the ferret, I apparently had just overlooked that. But I’m going to try to train my guinea pig to wheel at the smell of moldy canvases. She responds to the right carrot.

    And I’m not sure we have confirmation independent of defense counsel McGuigan of the details of the methods being employed.

    In homage to the US Attorney, who I hope has the pleasure of bring the case to resolution, I may pick up a box of Nancy Drews for the daughter of the blog’s graphic artist who did that wonderful meglumine and diatrizoate graphic ages ago.

    I’m optimistic that the paintings, even though ruined, will be recovered.

    Folks should stop sensationalizing the matter and suggesting that the conditions will be recovered in good condition. It merely undermines the prospects of closing the matter.

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/05/10/agents-swarm-reputed-mobster-home-in-conn/#ixzz1uUIi2nIO

  2. DXer said

    It is being reported (boston.com) that the FBI brought two beagles and a ferret.

    Hehe.

    And those mean people poked fun at the FBI for using Tinkerbelle and Lucy the bloodhounds that they used in Amerithrax to guide their theory for the first half decade.

  3. DXer said

    FBI The Set Up (Part one)
    An armored car heist gone south and the biggest museum theft in history combine to expose more dirt on the secretive Boston FBI. Did the feds frame a suspect for a different crime just to make him talk?
    BY MICHAEL BLANDING
    NOVEMBER 2003

    http://www.bostonmagazine.com/articles/fbi_the_set_up_part_one/

    Comment: I see the blog Stolen Vermeer is linking and featuring this Boston Magazine article — an amazing piece by freelance journalist Michael Blanding. Although it is a diversion from Amerithrax, Mr. Blanding provided our blog with the 302s he got from the court record (inadvertently filed, I believe) which revealed the name of an old guy visiting Merlino’s garage who was potentially a hot lead connected to the paintings.

    My point of view is different than the Stolen Vermeer blog. I think it is important that the FBI prioritize the murders committed in the wake of the paintings — and that they ensure that crime does not pay. Moreover, as to the issue of entrapment, the undercover operation run by the FBI strikes me as masterful. And legally, does not seem to constitute entrapment (and I’ve read the briefs and court opinion).

    The folks trying to cash in on the return of the paintings — by hook or crook — are trying to paint the FBI as indifferent. Well, be careful what you wish for… Criminals might do better when the FBI is not motivated.

    As I recall, the FBI had two informants in the garage and neither knew of the other.

    The agent who ran the operation died, I believe, the day before David Turner was sentenced. The FBI owes it to that agent to make sure that dangerous people go to jail. Some old paintings don’t matter a hill of beans in comparison. Making it profitable for criminals to recover from stolen paintings merely encourages future thefts.

    I hope the US Attorney has her priorities straight on this.

    And I hope she gets in the spirit of the treasure hunt, though, and takes ground penetrating radar to the gravel pit down the road from Joe Murray’s old summer home at Lake Belgrade. It’s not often you can play Nancy Drew and get paid for it.

  4. DXer said

    On the way, we could give a go at picking up Dutch Schultz’ hidden loot, which may be hidden in a secret sub-basement of a home built in 1935.

    Dutch Schultz in Fairfield County, Connecticut in 1935 : his horses, his hiding places, and his missing millions
    http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/1475537

    Stable logs show that Dutch Schultz and his bodyguard Lulu rode by every day while hiding in a Bridgeport, CT hotel during his trial in Syracuse for income tax evasion. Dutch wanted to get out of the crime business and settle down in Fairfield, CT. It would involve trying to persuade the orthopedic surgeon who owns the home that his 1935 was built by a proxy / alias of Dutch Schultz. (There was similar sub-basement at a Rhode Island mansion used by the gang and Dutch held his property in the names of proxies, such as a home on a famous estate he owned in the name of his driver). The loot stashed in the trunk is worth tens of millions and IRS has a claim to it. I’ve seen the files of Hoover and prosecutor Tom Dewey and greatly like the lead. But I have a diabetic cat who needs insulin twice a day and so have been slow to get back there. We would use the same special equipment to look into walls.

  5. DXer said

    Steve Hatfill’s attorney some years back sent me dozens of deposition transcripts from that case brought by Dr. Hatfill against the United States. I expect to start posting excerpts as background from the materials that are due to come out in the Stevens matter and to provide a historical backdrop to the investigation.

    The attorney, Attorney Connolly a year or two ago had another sensational result — against the same Amerithrax prosecutor — in the Blackwater case.

    The numerous murder indictments were dismissed for prosecutorial misconduct.

    • DXer said

      The decision dismissing the indictments based on the prosecutorial misconduct by the Amerithrax prosecutor who wrote the amerithrax Investigative Summary — and headed the investigation for a decade — has been reversed on appeal.

      Appeals court revives Blackwater shooting case

      Published: Friday, April 22, 2011, 9:11 PM Updated: Friday, April 22, 2011, 9:11 PM

      By The Associated Press

      WASHINGTON (AP) — An appeals court on Friday resurrected the case against four Blackwater Worldwide guards involved in a 2007 shooting in a Baghdad public square that killed 17 Iraqi citizens.

      A federal trial judge in Washington, Ricardo Urbina, threw out the case on New Year’s Eve 2009 after he found the Justice Department mishandled evidence and violated the guards’ constitutional rights.

      But a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Friday that Urbina wrongly interpreted the law. It ordered that he reconsider whether there was any tainted evidence against four of the five defendants —former Marines Evan Liberty of Rochester, N.H.; Donald Ball of West Valley City, Utah; and Dustin Heard of Knoxville, Tenn.; and Army veteran Paul Slough from Keller, Texas.

      ***

      The case against the five men initially fell apart because the State Department ordered the guards to explain what happened after the shooting in exchange for assurances that their statements would not be used in a criminal case. The five guards told investigators they fired their weapons, an admission that was crucial because forensic evidence could not determine who had fired.

      Because of the immunity deal, prosecutors had to build their case without those statements, a high legal hurdle that Urbina said the Justice Department failed to clear. Prosecutors read those statements, reviewed them in the investigation and used them to question witnesses and get search warrants, Urbina said. Key witnesses also reviewed the statements and the grand jury heard evidence that had been tainted by those statements, the judge said.

      Appellate judges Douglas Ginsburg, Merrick Garland and Stephen Williams ruled in a 17-page redacted review that Urbina “made a number of systemic errors based on an erroneous legal analysis.“ They ruled that Urbina excluded too much testimony and must reconsider for each defendant whether any evidence was tainted.

      Defense attorneys declined to comment. Justice spokesman Dean Boyd said the department is pleased with the ruling and assessing its next steps.

      Comment: As I’ve mentioned, I suspect Merrick Garland is really smart and makes a strong candidate for Attorney General given his work ethic and judicious temperament. I’m not familiar enough with the case to know whether I agree with the Court of Appeals decision or District Court opinion. But I would note as a practical matter the Amerithrax prosecutor Kenneth Kohl was busy with the Blackwater case in late 2008 and 2009 — and would never have had time to reexamine his conclusions in Amerithrax.

      There was never an opportunity to reassess his conclusion in Amerithrax despite his good faith and acumen.

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