CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

* Dr. Ivins committed suicide only after the FBI swabbed him for DNA to test the semen on the panties

Posted by Lew Weinstein on April 14, 2011

******

******

Dr. Heine says that the FBI told Dr. Ivins that Dr. Heine had implicated Bruce.

He said as a result Bruce flew into a rage and wanted to kill him.

Dr. Heine said that he said no such thing.

On the question of the FBI’s testing of the semen on the panties, did the FBI already have his DNA from taking the coffee cup as evidence in May 2007?

******

Advertisements

18 Responses to “* Dr. Ivins committed suicide only after the FBI swabbed him for DNA to test the semen on the panties”

  1. DXer said

    KWTX
    Today in History
    North Neighbor News-13 hours ago
    Army scientist Bruce E. Ivins, 62, named as a top suspect in anthrax mailing attacks in 2001, died at a hospital in Frederick, Md., after deliberately overdosing on …

    Comment: Did the FBI Agent/book author drive Ivins to suicide by falsely telling him that Henry Heine had implicated Bruce Ivins in the anthrax mailings?

  2. DXer said

    Dr. Ivins, by many, is thought of as a mute swan. People like Dr. Adamovicz and Dr. Andrews and many other scientists have felt that it was a moral obligation to speak up for the mute swan.

    New York wants to eradicate the species in New York State.

    The Change.Org petition to stop the NYS swan kill plan has 20,000 signatures.

    (The depradation permit process is fully adequate to handle any local nuisance problems — and the population has been steady for the past 10 years.)

    Everyone who signs the petition will get a personal copy of the Andrews civil deposition emailed to them.

    https://www.change.org/petitions/new-york-state-department-of-environmental-conservation-stop-new-york-state-s-swan-killing-plan

  3. DXer said

    Department of Justice Attorney Grafft writes in “Analysis of the Search Warrants of the Amerithrax Investigation:

    “This first group of digital warrants sought to access “electronic mail between Bruce Ivins and other individuals.” However, nowhere within the warrant application, the twenty-five page warrant affidavit, or the issued search warrant istself, was any content or party limitation placed on the emails to be seized. Without limiting the scope of email searches, all emails, including those between Ivins and his family members, non-work related friends, and others, could be seized. ***

    Other information, like Ivin’s use of email which described his apparent obsession with the sorority Kappa Kappa Gamma, seemingly had no bearing on the Amerithrax investigation, other than showing Ivins’s eccentricity.”

    At the time the prosecutor told Ivins that she would be calling his family to confirm his unhappiness at home, she was aware how physically upset he was at the time of the November 2007 search over the fact (as he told them) that they would find a bag of panties hidden in the basement. The prosecutor was disputing that he had reason to be in the lab even though the DOJ and FBI knew he was scheduled to be in the lab to work with the rabbits.

    The consulting psychiatrist advising the prosecutor and FBI knew he had previously attempted suicide a few months earlier.

    The psychiatrist then publicly released a report in which he centrally relied on his first part-time counselor (who annotated the notes of the psychiatrists) — without disclosing that in a 2009 book she explained that in 2000 she had been controlled by an alien who had implanted a chip in her butt. The part-time counselor had a paranoid fear that murderous astral entities were attached to her patients. She would have emergency exorcisms after work.

    Amerithrax represents the greatest intelligence analysis failure in the history of the United States.

  4. DXer said

    Laurie Garrett wrote:

    “The FBI’s case certainly points to areas of dark shame in Ivins’ life, disclosure of which he found humiliating, but the shame was sexual, not related to bioterrorism.” The bulk of the evidence against Ivins was circumstantial, and every bit as strained as that the FBI had leveled against Hatfill and other persons of the agency’s interest.”

  5. DXer said

    Laurie Garrett describes the plea bargain offered on July 27:

    “Under the reported terms, if Ivins refused the plea bargain, he would have been indicted that day and incarcerated, pending a federal court bail hearing.”

    Comment: That may have been the offer, if it was, but it later was revealed that the grand jury was weeks away from indictment of anyone.

    Dr. Heine says that they falsely told him that Dr. Heine had said he was the perpetrator — thus triggering his rage.

  6. DXer said

    David Willman writes in MIrage Man (June 7, 2011):

    “As for the single speck of dead skin? It did not belong to Hatfill’s girlfriend or anyone else of interest to the investigation. The skin was traced to a female technician who had accidentally contaminated the evidence soon after its arrival at the FBI lab and had resigned under pressure in June 2002 because of other irregularities, including falsifications of data. She later pleaded guilty to submitting falsified DNA analysis reports in more than one hundred cases; the anthrax case was not among them.” (p. 204) citing n. 31 at p. 402 (“Author’s interviews with present and former officials familiar with the role of the former technician Jacqueline A. Blake in accidentally contaminating the Leahy letter from within the FBI laboratory, 2009 and 2010.”

    • DXer said

      http://articles.latimes.com/2004/may/19/nation/na-briefs19.4

      Ex-FBI Biologist Admits Falsifying DNA Data
      IN BRIEF / WASHINGTON, D.C.
      May 19, 2004|From Times Wire Reports
      A former biologist in the FBI laboratory pleaded guilty to submitting falsified DNA analysis reports in more than 100 cases.

      Jacqueline A. Blake, 40, of Upper Marlboro, Md., pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Washington to a single count of making false statements on official government reports she prepared. Blake faces a maximum penalty of a year in prison and a $100,000 fine at sentencing scheduled for Sept. 20.

  7. DXer said

    Pat Clawson, Dr. Hatfill’s friend, recommended that Dr. Hatfill’s attorney get in touch with handwriting analyst Mark Smith. He said he had insights on the Task Force investigators.

    Given that Mark Smith believes in paranormal auras, which have no scientific basis and are easily debunked in simply conducted experiments, I have to say that the 302 interview statements, in comparison, demonstrate very solid work product.

    “From: “Pat Clawson” [email redacted]
    To: “Vic Glasberg” [email redacted]
    Sent: Tuesday, September I0, 2002 8:33 PM
    Subject: Clawson’s Last Posting Before Leaving for Seattle ….

    Victor…

    Aiso, you need to phone Mark Smith, the handwriting expert who has offered his services.

    Interesting guy – and he’s been in touch with the FBI agents working Steve’s case. He has some insight at to their ineptness that you might find helpfu!. His phone is 301 xxx xxxx

    ***
    Regards,
    Pat Clawson”

    Who was Mark’s colleague(s) that helped with the project, that according to the website (from archives) that I’ve linked, was suggested by former CIA honcho Cannistraro?

    This is the forensic psychiatrist who recommends Mark’s book on auras. His family had him committed due to his “mirror gazing”. (You stare at your face in the mirror long enough and your face changes and you see other people etc.)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Moody

    Question: Who were Mark Smith’s two associates by the Washington Post? (This is discoverable under FOIA.)

    We’ve seen, from the face of the website still on the Wayback Machine, that former CIA honcho Cannistraro was involved. Was he one of the two associates or were there two additional. If so, who were they?

    The Pursuit of Steven Hatfill
    By Marilyn W. Thompson
    Sunday, September 14, 2003; Page W06
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A49717-2003Sep9?language=printer

    But this case posed an entirely new set of challenges, and Roth was willing to try almost anything to solve it. At one point, he held a meeting with Mark Smith, a veteran Maryland handwriting analyst, and two associates, who proposed setting up a computer sting operation in an effort to identify the killer. Smith would try to lure the perpetrator to two Web sites, handtomind.com and anthraxhunt.com, by making provocative comments about the killer’s handwriting and publicizing the sites in interviews and on TV’s “America’s Most Wanted.”

    Roth encouraged the men to try the plan. If it worked, they might be eligible for the FBI reward for information leading to a conviction — a sum that began at $1 million and eventually ballooned to the current $2.5 million. The sting operation lasted a few months and attracted at least two people on the bureau’s watch list, but it apparently produced no breakthroughs.

    Smith says the FBI’s frustrations with the case were palpable. At one meeting at the Washington field office, agents talked candidly about the toll the long hours were exacting on their families. Roth vented, too, groaning to no one in particular, “Get me out of this!”

    Mark Smith, according to the Washington Post, when he was not lecturing about interpreting personalities based on a person’s aura, helped set up websites “handtomind.com and anthraxhunt.com” and “making provocative comments about the killer’s handwriting and publicizing the sites in interviews and on TV’s “America’s Most Wanted.””

    How did this FBI’s strategy of provoking a suspect by talking about sexual dysfunction, being bi-polar, and having a martyr complex work?

    Didn’t it in fact allow the agents to close the case? Wouldn’t the FBI and its experts have been creamed at trial?

  8. DXer said

    In another thread, I point out that the anthraxhunt website set up by Mark Smith was set up at the suggestion of former CIA Vince Cannistraro. (according to the website archived version linked). The FBI sting operation was encouraged by lead investigator Bob Roth who desperately wanted to close the case, according to the washington post article “The Pursuit of Steve Hatfill.” It was intended to prompt a reaction by characterizing the writer as sexually dysfunctional, bi-polar, paranoid etc. Vince and Mark and the lead investigator Bob Roth can tell us what reaction they wanted to prompt. They can also tell us who the other colleague was involved in setting up the website.

    The other website Mark Smith set up gave an email to send tips. It was called handtomind.org and asked for verifiable leads to be forwarded. (I never noticed that website. But, in any event, I never knew any bi-polar, sexually dysfunctional, paranoid types to tell the CIA about; only folks, for example, coordinating with Anwar Awlaki, childhood friends of Dr. Ayman, that sort of thing). But the FBI had no interest in Mr. Awlaki and released him in 2002 so he could visit Ali Al-Timimi, the fellow sharing the suite with the leading DARPA-funded Ames researchers.

    http://replay.waybackmachine.org/20040520000227/http://www.handtomind.com/

    Mark and Vince and Bob deserve a lot of credit — if it turns out that they were right in the profile. Dr. Ivins fit the graphologist’s opinion to a tee — and that is without even knowing what color aura he gave off.

    • DXer said

      In perusing the archives.org archived versions of the website, I see another one that mentions an e-book explaining his handwriting analysis. Someone will want to snag a copy.

      Now I don’t know how Vince Foster, the other “handwriting expert” consulted in July 2002 by the FBI, got all the attention… just because he pointed to Dr. Hatfill.

      …when all the while this Amerithrax/CIA backed Mark Smith was pointing to a profile that fit Dr. Ivins to a tee! For the details of his analysis,

      New Anthrax Terrorist Profile Released

      On 9/11 foreign terrorists struck the United States of America. Over the next several weeks, we were struck again, this time by a domestic terrorist who is still at large, and may strike again.

      You can help to take this threat of terrorism out of our daily lives.

      This killer has waged psychological and biological terrorism on us using our own postal service, with just a few letters. Now lets use psychological profiling and analysis to take the war to him.

      This NEW detailed profile is based on the handwriting analysis of the anthrax killer, done by Mr. Mark Smith, at the request of Vince Cannistraro, former CIA Director of Counter Terrorism, and verified as accurate by Law Enforcement Officials currently working on the case.

      Mr. Mark Smith is a 35 year veteran and autority on handwriting analysis. The methods used to compile this new profile on the Anthrax Killer is revealed in his new ebook “Hand to Mind” – How to Analyze Anyone’s Handwriting … even the Anthrax Killers:

      Click Book
      How to Analyze Anyone’s Handwriting
      …. even the Anthrax Killer’s.

      HandToMind.com

      Mr. Smith is most known for his live on-the-air handwriting analysis of Oprah Winfrey, during which he revealed her “childhood abuse issues” eight years prior to her public admission.

      It is a certainty that many of us, at one time or another, have come in contact with this man, through work, school or even possibly in the military.

      Please review the Anthrax letter handwriting samples and handwriting analysis on this web site then consider:

      Have you seen this handwriting anywhere before?

      Does our profile sound like someone you know?

      The Unabomber was a similar case of domestic terror by mail, and he remained at large for 17 years, yet, when his manifesto was published he was apprehended within weeks.

      We can’t afford to wait 17 years this time, so we’re publishing a profile of this murderer through an analysis of his Anthrax letters now.

      A person’s handwriting speaks volumes if you know what to look for. Even an expert can only disguise a limited number of things by deception in their writing.

      It is more important now, than ever, to arm yourself with knowledge and help prevent this from happening again. There is no emergency warning system, of any color, for this kind of terrorist threat.

      What is more terror provoking than the possibility of having a lethal weapon delivered right to your mailbox? Learn what to look for on envelopes before you open them.

      Remember that two of the people that died, the medical worker, and the elderly lady in Connecticut had no seeming connection to the other cases, and no link has yet been found. It can happen again.

      If you need a greater incentive than simply helping to find this killer, the FBI is offering 2.5 million dollars for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person who sent these letters.

      Don’t assume that your information is unimportant. The FBI has asked that you report your information even if you think it might be unimportant or that someone else may have already reported what you know.

      You may know the anthrax killer, and be able to bring this murderer to justice. Your call may be the one that provides them with the one piece of information they need to solve this case.

  9. DXer said

    Not long after the mailings, the law enforcement authorities contacted Mark Smith who opined that the sender was a white, middle-aged man who suffers from bipolar disorder, a sexual dysfunction and a martyr complex.

    Dr. Ivins had a copy of the news article at his home before his suicide. See Section 7 of the BEI materials on the FBI’s FOIA page.

    I have pointed out that graphology is a pseudoscience. It does not satisfy Daubert principles and is not accepted as expert evidence by federal district courts.

    This blog is all about trying distinguish between probative evidence and evidence that is not probative — and about pointing out where the investigators and managers have relied on evidence that is not probative.

    Anthrax smelling dogs come to mind in connection with a Hatfill Theory.

    “Richard Rowley,” I recommend you submit a FOIA to the FBI using their electronic form seeking all opinions by handwriting analysts or graphologists in the investigation, to include but not limited to the opinion by Mark Smith referenced in the Washington Times article dated August 28, 2002. The request won’t cost you anything (just ask that the fee be waived and be sure to tell them you will promptly cause the report by Mark Smith to be uploaded).

    “Mr. Smith in April told The Times that federal law enforcement authorities had solicited his services immediately after October’s anthrax attacks. Upon analyzing the letters, he said the person sending them was a white, middle-aged man who suffers from a bipolar disorder, a sexual dysfunction and a martyr complex.”

    Once you obtain the opinion, we can give it to the GAO chief scientist . GAO investigators can ask the Postal Inspectors and FBI agents whether they were aware of the opinion and whether it factored into their judgments in the case.

    The entire purpose of the GAO review is to test whether the conclusion of the investigators is based on sound science.

    And as I mentioned, graphology is a pseudoscience. It does not satisfy Daubert principles.

    Going from anthrax smelling dogs to graphology is not a step forward sound criminal investigation method.

    As you assess the science relied upon by the investigators: ask yourself this basic question: What would Abby of NCIS think?

    Hatfill to undergo blood test for FBI
    Guy Taylor
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Published 8/28/2002

    The attorney for Steven J. Hatfill says the FBI has asked the former Army researcher, who has been named a “person of interest” in the government’s anthrax probe, to submit blood and handwriting samples to investigators.

    “The FBI has asked for a handwriting sample and a blood sample. The neat thing is that Hatfill is the one who had to tell them the kind of [blood] test that they need to be doing,” Mr. Hatfill’s attorney, Victor M. Glasberg, told The Washington Times yesterday.

    Mr. Glasberg said he expects the FBI will be able to determine by tomorrow whether Mr. Hatfill’s handwriting matches that on the anthrax letters sent in the fall to media outlets in Florida and New York and to two senators on Capitol Hill. The anthrax attacks killed five persons.

    Mr. Glasberg said that if the bureau does not make public its analysis of Mr. Hatfill’s handwriting within “about five days,” Mr. Hatfill will submit samples to a priva

    te handwriting analyst who has offered to examine them.

    The FBI declined to confirm whether blood or handwriting samples have been sought. “Any handwriting samples and results of any scientific or forensic examinations are evidence, which we don’t discuss,” said Chris Murray, spokesman for the bureau’s Washington field office, which is leading the government’s anthrax probe.

    A new suspicious letter appeared this week at the Nashville, Tenn., offices of former Vice President Al Gore.

    Jano Cabrera, a spokesman for Mr. Gore, said the letter was received in the mail Monday. It was opened yesterday by office manager Mary Patterson, and white powder spilled when the letter was opened. The room where the letter was opened has been quarantined, and a hazardous-materials team is investigating.

    The envelope was postmarked from Tennessee and was stamped on the back with “This letter has not been inspected by the corrections department.”

    Steve Hayes, Tennessee Department of Correction spokesman, said it is regular policy to stamp letters that haven’t been inspected as being sent from a correctional facility. He said the wording the department uses is different from that on the letter.

    On Sunday, Mr. Hatfill said he would voluntarily submit a blood test to the FBI to confirm whether he had been exposed or inoculated against anthrax. It was not clear at that time whether the FBI would accept the offer.

    Mr. Hatfill told reporters the blood test was his idea and the fact that the FBI had not yet asked him to submit samples indicated the government’s unfamiliarity with conducting such a scientific investigation.

    Mr. Glasberg said yesterday he wanted the results of any blood work or handwriting analysis to be widely publicized to help exonerate his client. He said he was considering an offer made by Virginia-based handwriting analyst Mark Smith to examine Mr. Hatfill’s handwriting.

    Mr. Smith in April told The Times that federal law enforcement authorities had solicited his services immediately after October’s anthrax attacks. Upon analyzing the letters, he said the person sending them was a white, middle-aged man who suffers from bipolar disorder, a sexual dysfunction and a martyr complex.

    • DXer said

      Graphology

      Handwriting analysis, or graphology, has been popular as a parlor game and
      carnival attraction for many decades. The principle behind graphology is that traits can
      be assessed from various characteristics of a person’s handwriting. Since graphology is
      not widely used in the United States—although Gatewood and Field (2001) estimated
      that 2,500 U.S. firms use graphology as a screening device!—there would be little reason
      to even mention it if it were not for the increasing presence of other cultures in the
      American workplace and the appearance of Americans in the international workplace.
      Thus, Americans who emigrate to France or Israel may be surprised to be asked to
      provide a handwriting sample as part of a preemployment screening process. Similarly,
      a manager in an American workplace who formerly worked for a French or Israeli
      company may suggest that his or her HR department consider adding a graphology
      component to the screening of applicants.

      Rafaeli and Klimoski (1983) studied the relationship between assessments of the
      handwriting of 104 real estate agents conducted by expert graphologists and measures of
      the performance of those agents. No relationship was found. Other studies have come to
      similar conclusions. When a study seems to support the validity of the graphological
      analysis, it is likely that the “validity” was produced by the content of what participants
      wrote, not the characteristics of their handwriting. In a meta-analysis of graphology
      studies, Neter and Ben-Shakhar (1989) found that graphologists were no better than
      nongraphologists in predicting future performance by examining an applicant’s
      handwriting.

      The lack of value notwithstanding, it is interesting to speculate why graphology
      seems to have such a firm foothold in France and Israel. We asked two questions of a
      French (Steiner, 2002) and an Israeli (Eden, 2002) I-O colleague: Is it true that
      graphology is still practiced widely? If so, why? Both colleagues answered that it was
      correct that graphology was still practiced widely in their countries, much to their
      embarrassment. Indeed, our Israeli colleague reported that many employers prefer to
      receive résumés in handwritten form so that they can be subjected to graphological
      analysis. The “why” question was a bit more complicated. Our Israeli colleague
      speculated that the reason for the widespread use of graphology in Israel was that the
      procedure has been used in France for over 100 years, and there were very close ties
      between Israel and France until the mid-1950s. The Israelis generally adopted French
      business practices, including those related to HR, without much critical evaluation. The
      French colleague answered that graphology had been practiced in France since 1870,
      inspired by a book published in Italy in 1622. At the turn of the 20th century, graphology
      was popular in many European countries. By the late 1940s graphology had taken on the
      status of a vocational training program in France, complete with two-year diplomas. To
      this day graphologists in France exert a strong commercial lobbying effort. A French
      psychologist has written extensively about the history and futility of handwriting analysis
      (Bruchon-Schweitzer, 2002), but apparently to no avail.

      Bruchon-Schweitzer, M. (2002). Must one use graphology in personnel selection. In C.
      Levy-Leboyer, M. Huteau, C. Louche, and J. Rolland (Eds.). RH: Les Apports de
      la Psychologie du Travail. Paris: Editions d’Organisation.

      Eden, D. ( 2002). Personal communication.

      Gatewood, R. D., & Feild, H. S. (2001). Human resource selection (5th Ed.). New York:
      Harcourt.

      Neter, E., & Ben-Shakhar, G. (1989). The predictive validity of graphological inferences:
      A meta-analytic approach. Personality and Individual Differences, 10, 737-745.

      Rafaeli, A., & Klomoski, R. J. (1983). Predicting sales success through handwriting
      analysis: An evaluation of the effects of training and handwriting sample content.
      Journal of Applied Psychology, 68, 212-217.

      • DXer said

        To expedite matters, Mark Smith might be willing to provide his opinion directly.

        Moreover, he might be able to explain the extent to which his analysis depends on psycholinguistics rather than graphology.

        See, e.g., Don Foster’s ill-fated psycholinguistic assessment pointing to Dr. Hatfill.

        I might be unfairly characterizing Mark Smith’s opinion as graphology rather than a psycholinguistic analysis based on content.

        If a psycholinguistic analysis that was relied upon by investigators, the GAO can consider the validity of that field as applied to a brief note.

        For example, Dr. Ayman (see his video) referred to the D.C. law firm Patton, Boggs. Does that mean he’s not Dr. Ayman because a Salafi-Jihadist would not know the names of DC law firms? A psycholinguistic analysis of the short threatening note often says more about the education and background and motivation of the person giving the opinion than the education and background and motivation of the person who wrote the note.

    • DXer said

      From Washington Times article in Dr. Ivins files seized upon a search:

      “Mr. Smith in April told The Times that federal law enforcement authorities had solicited his services immediately after October’s anthrax attacks. Upon analyzing the letters, he said the person sending them was a white, middle-aged man who suffers from bipolar disorder, a sexual dysfunction and a martyr complex.


      In addition to offering opinions on handwriting analysis, Mark Smith is an expert on “auric visions.” What color aura did Dr. Ivins have? Did the agents at Quantico rely on that also?

      http://books.google.com/books?id=Um5MJ6UVMccC&pg=PA122&lpg=PA122&dq=%22Mark+Smith%22++%22auric+vision%22&source=bl&ots=cuj2nKKRAJ&sig=QBrnbHjg22KbCmjOhGLZZ9T__Wg&hl=en&ei=ZyGoTf7YPMvdgQfdoPjzBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBQQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22Mark%20Smith%22%20%20%22auric%20vision%22&f=false

      “Your aura is a physical manifestation of your soul, and now you can learn how to see auras for yourself by following ten easy steps. There’s nothing metaphysical ivnolved, just simple physics and normal eyesight. Seeing the aura is easy, and Mark Smith shows you how to do it only 60 seconds!”

      Did Mark Smith, in addition to advising the FBI that the mailer was bi-polar and sexually dysfunctional and suffered a martyr complex, teach the agents at Quantico to read the aura of suspects? GAO should want to know. Taxpayers being threatened by Ayman Zawahiri and Anwar Awlaki with anthrax want to know. Hey, Mark, what color is Dr. Ayman’s aura? Is it possible to see his aura on a video?

      So “Richard Rowley”, in addition to obtaining a FOIA the handwriting analysis, you should seek any opinion he gave to the FBI about reading the auras of suspects.

      • DXer said

        I believe a fuller and earlier description of Mark Smith’s handwriting analysis is April 2002.

        Handwriting analyst adds to anthrax terrorist”s profile.

        Publication: The Washington Times
        Publication Date: 18-APR-02

        Byline: Guy Taylor, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

        A handwriting analyst familiar with the anthrax-laced letters sent last fall to Capitol Hill says the sender is a white, middle-age man who suffers from bipolar disorder, a sexual dysfunction and a martyr complex.

        These details, which do not appear in the FBI’s profile of the sender, could sharpen the focus of the 6-month-old investigation into who sent the lethal letters, says Mark Smith, a handwriting analyst based in Virginia.

        “At this point, the FBI investigation has been focused on people who have had access to anthrax,” Mr. Smith says. “Taking into account the possibility that these characteristics are inherent in the makeup of the perpetrator could greatly reduce the size of the investigation.”

        Mr. Smith says federal law-enforcement authorities solicited his services in the weeks immediately following October’s anthrax attacks. FBI officials would neither confirm nor deny his account and declined to comment on his findings.

        The FBI’s profile describes the sender as being a nonconfrontational person who may hold grudges for a long time and who is familiar with the Trenton, N.J., area – from where anthrax-laced letters were mailed to Sens. Tom Daschle of South Dakota and Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont. The profile also notes the sender’s access to anthrax spores and scientific experience in dealing with the bacteria.

        Law-enforcement sources and others, including biochemical specialists questioned by the FBI, have said the investigation has focused on former and current scientists associated with the federal government’s anthrax program at Fort Detrick, Md. The spores in the Daschle and Leahy letters match samples of an anthrax strain produced at the facility.

        FBI Assistant Director Van A. Harp, who heads the FBI’s anthrax task force, told the 40,000 members of the American Society for Microbiology in a letter in January that it “is very likely that one or more of you know” the sender of the anthrax letters, which have killed five persons.

        Mr. Smith, who last month posted…

        Comment: Did FBI Quantico ever ask Mr. Smith to read Bruce’s aura?

  10. richard rowley said

    This is something I’d been meaning to get back to for the longest time:
    ——————
    Dr. Heine says that the FBI told Dr. Ivins that Dr. Heine had implicated Bruce.
    He said as a result Bruce flew into a rage and wanted to kill him.

    Dr. Heine said that he said no such thing.
    —————————————————————————————
    Here’s the rub: by LYING to Ivins the investigators got the very (verbal) behaviour they claim ‘proves’ that he was ‘murderous’ in nature.

    Aside from the fact that it’s 1)dishonest and manipulative 2) the psychological equivalent of ‘entrapment’ (no lies by the task force, no murderous rage toward Heine), all this once again highlights how the investigation blurred the distinction between murderous intentions as the result of (here an incited)rage and the murderous but coldly so ACTIONS of the Amerithrax Case. Two different psychological profiles.

    I think there should be some legal obstacle to investigative agencies tormenting people for weeks, months, even years at a time in order to ‘break’ them. One such obstacle would be to make it ILLEGAL to forbid USAMRIID employees (or any federal employees) from talking to someone like Ivins when he was under suspicion….

    • Zicon said

      Was just apart of their tactics, which should have been done with great caution due to the psycological state he was in, and the BAU would have known better!
      My opinion he commited suicide on the pre-tence of his home life getting destroyed of what he had left, on top of the BS he was being put through from work and the anthrax.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: