CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

Archive for April 3rd, 2010

* more emails to & from Dr. Bruce Ivins (#2 post today)

Posted by DXer on April 3, 2010

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The New York Times says the FBI’s anthrax case has “too many loose ends.” Find out where some of those looses ends might have originated in my novel CASE CLOSED. Sure it’s fiction, but many readers, including a highly respected member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, think my premise is actually “quite plausible.”

* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | 12 Comments »

* more emails to & from Dr. Bruce Ivins

Posted by DXer on April 3, 2010

.

The New York Times says the FBI’s anthrax case has “too many loose ends.” Find out where some of those looses ends might have originated in my novel CASE CLOSED. Sure it’s fiction, but many readers, including a highly respected member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, think my premise is actually “quite plausible.”

* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

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* In Amerithrax, the leaker of the hyped Hatfill stories was the father of the lawyer who later represented “anthrax weapons suspect” Al-Timimi pro bono

Posted by DXer on April 3, 2010

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 7 Comments »

* when did plans for an anthrax attack begin? consider this fictional excerpt from the novel CASE CLOSED

Posted by DXer on April 3, 2010

Ayman al-Zawahiri

NOTE: this is a portion of a DXer graphic; see the entire graphic at … https://caseclosedbylewweinstein.wordpress.com/2010/02/20/from-dxer-infiltration-of-u-s-biodefense-ayman-zawaharis-plan-to-use-anthrax-against-u-s-targets/

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When did terrorists first initiate plans to use anthrax?

in 1999? or many years before?

Consider this fictional scenario, beginning in 1982,

taken from my novel CASE CLOSED …

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CASE CLOSED, p.1

“When the prayer is ended, then disperse abroad in the land and seek of Allah’s grace, and remember Allah much, that you may be successful.”

The young man was enjoying his first class on his first day at college, a fine fall day in 1982. A studious, non-athletic boy with few friends from his high school years, he welcomed a new start in an environment where brains were important. He had been admitted to a prestigious university; he intended to become a scientist, perhaps majoring in biology or chemistry. But there were distribution requirements; he was in a class on comparative religion; he was fascinated.

He had been raised in a nominally Christian family, had known several Jews, but had never met a Muslim. He was thrilled by the story of how Mohammed had drawn together elements from Judaism and Christianity, combined these with his own revelation; how this new religion had spread across the world and now had over one billion adherents. He wasn’t sure if he was more impressed with the religious insights or the military skills that had been essential to the spread of Islam, but his mind was aflame. This was what college was all about, he thought. New ideas to stretch the mind.

That was Monday. On Friday, after the third class, he was approached by a slight boy with a middle eastern appearance.

“I see you’re attracted to the words of the Prophet. My name is Tarek bin Laden. I’m a Muslim. Perhaps we can study together.”

From this beginning, a deep friendship ensued. The two young men had endless discussions about many topics, but mostly religion. Tarek was exotic; imagine having a friend from Saudi Arabia. Nobody in his high school even knew where Saudi Arabia was. It didn’t hurt that Tarek bin Laden was also obscenely wealthy. With his friend’s money, new ways of living opened up that would otherwise have been inconceivable.

By his junior year, the young man was seriously considering whether to convert to Islam; he was surprised when Tarek discouraged him. “There are many ways to serve the Prophet,” Tarek said. “He will find a way for you.”

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The New York Times says the FBI’s anthrax case has “too many loose ends.” Find out where some of those looses ends might have originated in my novel CASE CLOSED.

Sure it’s fiction, but many readers, including a highly respected member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, think my premise is actually “quite plausible.”

* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

******

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 16 Comments »