CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

Archive for March 6th, 2010

* Rutgers professor and Amerithrax expert Dr. Leonard Cole … there remain important gaps in the FBI’s evidence against Dr. Bruce Ivins

Posted by DXer on March 6, 2010

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The New York Times says the FBI’s anthrax case has “too many loose ends.” Find out where some of those looses ends might have originated in my novel CASE CLOSED. Sure it’s fiction, but many readers, including a highly respected member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, think my premise is actually “quite plausible.”

* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

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Dr. Leonard Cole

POLITICAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR LEONARD COLE, of Rutgers University, the only person outside law enforcement to have interviewed every one of the surviving inhalation-anthrax victims, along with the relatives, friends, and associates of those who died, as well as the public health officials, scientists, researchers, hospital workers, and treating physicians. says …

  • “the evidence is circumstantial and no way can Ivins be considered guilty ‘beyond a reasonable doubt,’ as has been claimed by Justice Department and FBI officials, including FBI Director Robert Mueller.”
  • “There remain important gaps in the evidence.”
  • For example, Ivins lived and worked in Frederick, Maryland, and the letters were mailed from Princeton, New Jersey. “There are no witnesses or other evidence that placed him in Princeton at the times of the mailings.”
  • Cole says that even if you concede that Ivins had developed and stored the strain of anthrax sent in the letters, “more than one hundred co-workers had access to his laboratory, which was at the Army’s Fort Detrick research facility”

Dr. Cole holds a PhD in political science from Columbia University and teaches public policy at Rutgers University.

The Anthrax Letters: A Bioterrorism Expert Investigates the Attack That Shocked America

by Leonard Cole

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* from the Anderson Cooper CNN interview … Jean Duley said what she knows from his behavior, from the things he said to her and his mental character, leaves her without a doubt that her client, Bruce Ivins, was the man who plotted and mailed the anthrax that threw a nation into panic.

Posted by DXer on March 6, 2010

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The New York Times says the FBI’s anthrax case has “too many loose ends.” Find out where some of those looses ends might have originated in my novel CASE CLOSED. Sure it’s fiction, but many readers, including a highly respected member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, think my premise is actually “quite plausible.”

* buy CASE CLOSED at amazon *

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Anderson Cooper & Jean Duley

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see related post …

* Anderson Cooper is drawn into Jean Duley’s questionable role

in the highly dubious FBI case against Dr. Bruce Ivins

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Joe Johns and Justine Redman write on the Anderson Cooper (AC360°) blog …

  • Jean Duley was an addiction counselor.
    • She describes one of her clients as a slight, mousey, yet charming man, with a vodka andValium habit.
    • By the time he started seeing Duley, Dr. Bruce Ivins was under suspicion by the FBI for launching America’s age of bioterrorism by mailing letters laced with deadly anthrax.
    • The investigation had been going on for seven years.
  • Ivins told Duley he didn’t do it, and said he believed one of his colleagues was the anthrax killer, but, in July 2008, authorities were closing in on Ivins as their prime suspect.
    • He walked into Duley’s counseling office almost out of control.
    • “I’d never seen him that way before,” Jean Duley recalled to CNN in an exclusive interview. She’d been seeing him twice a week for about six months, during which time he was hospitalized for what she called a suicide attempt.
    • “He was extremely angry and nasty in his demeanor. The receptionist actually came back to me and said there’s something wrong, you need to go deal with it. There’s something wrong with him.”
  • “Immediately, he started in on his tirade and started talking about how he was not going to be indicted.
    • He wasn’t going to allow them to indict him on five counts of capital murder,” she said. “And he was not going to go out willingly and he was going to go out in a blaze of glory.”
    • “He had said that the next day he was getting a Glock [hand gun] from his son.
    • And he was going to take out his colleagues at Fort Detrick, the people that had wronged him at Fort Detrick, the FBI agents.
    • And it wasn’t a casual conversation. He was extremely angry and extremely rageful and he described it in detail:
      • All the ammunition that he had.
      • He had bought a bulletproof vest.
      • He had made a bulletproof vest.
      • He had written a detailed plan on how to do it.”
  • With threats so specific, Duley said that despite normal privacy rules, she was obligated to alert authorities.
    • She called the police and they took him to a hospital.
    • Shortly afterward, Ivins transferred to a Baltimore psychiatric hospital, an inpatient for drugs and alcohol under psychiatric evaluation.
  • From the hospital, Ivins phoned Duley twice. While he acknowledged that he was a threat to himself and others, he accused her of betraying him. Duley felt threatened, and when Ivins checked himself out of care, she went to court to file for a temporary restraining order against him.
  • Ivins went home with his wife to their house in Frederick, Maryland.
  • Just days after returning home, Ivins killed himself. He overdosed on Tylenol.

Read the entire post at … http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2010/03/05/inside-the-mind-of-the-anthrax-killer/

LMW COMMENT …

  • Jean Duley knows absolutely nothing about what happened in 2001 when the anthrax letters were mailed.
  • The man she observed in 2008 had been harassed and threatened by the FBI for months; he was distraught and on the verge of suicide.
  • Whatever Bruce Ivins may or may not have said in 2008, even if it was as threatening as his addictions counselor reports, proves absolutely nothing about whether he was the anthrax killer or not.
  • Jean Duley displays her own incompetence and lack of professionalism by drawing those conclusions.
  • To the extent that the FBI relied on Jean Duley’s testimony for any part of their pathetic case against Ivins, it only demonstrates how desperately they were grasping at straws.

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