CASE CLOSED … what really happened in the 2001 anthrax attacks?

* evidence of al Qaeda 2001 anthrax plot released

Posted by DXer on August 26, 2009

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Ben Conery writes in the Washington Times (8/26/09) …

  • Documents released this week related to the CIA’s terrorist interrogation program …  explain how CIA interrogators tricked Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and Yazid Sufaat, a Malaysian scientist who was educated in the U.S., to reveal the details of al Qaeda’s ultimately unsuccessful plot in 2001 to unleash a deadly anthrax attack against Americans.
  • Yazid admitted his principal role in the anthrax program and provided some fragmentary information on his, at the time, still at-large defendants,” the report stated.
  • Authorities said Sufaat had critical knowledge about the plot as he had spent months hunkered down in a laboratory near an airport in Afghanistan trying to cook up a batch of anthrax.
  • “But it was ultimately the information provided by [Mohammed] that led to the capture of Yazid’s two principal assistants in the anthrax program,” the report said, while not naming the two other suspects.

read the entire article at …http://washingtontimes.com/news/2009/aug/26/cias-police-ploys-nabbed-terrorists/print/

LMW COMMENT …

Are we really so sure that all of al Qaeda’s anthrax attack plots were unsuccessful? If the FBI’s case against Dr. Ivins is as weak as it seems, then who did send the anthrax attack letters?

10 Responses to “* evidence of al Qaeda 2001 anthrax plot released”

  1. DXer said

    In August 2009, Lew raised Al Qaeda’s anthrax program. I gave some background and noted that Yazid Sufaat had headed from Malaysia to Pakistan. (I saw the report in a local Pakistani news item). I may be slow to learn new scrabble words but I never said I didn’t speak Urdu.

    I wrote in 2009:

    “He is suspected by Pakistani intelligence of having arrived in Pakistan.”

    DXer said

    August 26, 2009 at 12:10 pm
    Let’s pick up the story of Al Qaeda’s anthrax planning with Hambali, anthrax lab tech Yazid Sufaat and the anthrax bomb maker Muklis Yunos.

    George Tenet in his May 2007 In the Center of the Storm says Sufaat was “the self-described ‘CEO’ of al-Qai’da’s anthrax program.” Tenet reports that “Sufaat had impeccable extremist credentials” and “[i]n 2000 he had been introduced to Ayman al-Zawahiri personally, by Hambali, as the man who was capable of leading al-Qai’da’s biological weapons program.”

    Participants at a key meeting in Kuala Lumpur in January 2000 included Hambali, Yazid Sufaat, two of the 9/11 hijackers, Nawaf Alhazmi and Khalid Almidhar, Cole planner Attash aka Khallad, and others. Tawfiq Bin Attash was a long time Bin Laden operative. The Yemeni first went to Afghanistan in 1989. He came to lead Bin Laden’s bodyguards and was an intermediary between Bin Laden and those who carried out the bombing of the Cole in October 2000. Attash also had been a key planner in the 1998 embassy bombings, serving as the link between the Nairobi cell and Bin Laden and Atef. Khalid Almhidhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, was from Saudi Arabia but was a Yemeni national. Almhidhar was named an unindicted co-conspirator in the indictment against Zacarias Moussaoui. Al-Hindi, who along with Jafar the Pilot would later case the NYC landmarks, had gone to Kuala Lumpur with Khallad. While not at the meeting with the hijackers, he met Hambali shortly after that meeting.

    Zacarias Moussaoui was alleged, at least initially, to have received his money from Yazid Sufaat, under the cover of a company managed by his wife named Infocus Tech. A legitimate company, the company has eight employees and virtually no connection to the US. The company was an importer of US computer software and hardware. After authorities found a letter signed by Yazid Sufaat purporting to authorize Zacarias Moussaoui as its marketing representative, authorities went looking for Sufaat. But by then, he had left for Pakistan and Afghanistan. According to his wife, he went to Pakistan in June 2001 because he wanted to do his doctorate in pathology at the University of Karachi. Dursina had attended Sacramento State with Sufaat. It was her mother who encouraged Yazid’s religious studies. According to his wife, Sejarhtul Dursina, “He had planned to set up a medical support unit in Afghanistan, near Kandahar.” Kandahar is where Al Qaeda established its anthrax lab and where extremely virulent (but unweaponized) anthrax was found at a home identified by Hambali after his capture.

    Sufaat graduated from California State University, Sacramento in 1987. He received a bachelors degree in biological sciences, concentrating on clinical laboratory technology, with a minor in chemistry. Sac State biological sciences professor Robert Metcalf taught Sufaat a food microbiology class in the spring of 1986. The first lesson in class was to teach students how German physician Robert Koch proved that anthrax was caused by a specific bacterium. “All of my students know how to isolate anthrax in soil samples,” Metcalf told the Chicago Tribune. “Anthrax was the first organism we talked about.” Sufaat joined the Malaysian army, where he was a lab technician assigned to a medical brigade. After five years, he left the service with the rank of captain and worked for a civilian laboratory. In August 1993, he set up his own company, Green Laboratory Medicine. The 9/11 Commission Report notes that Sufaat started work on the al Qaeda biological weapons program after he participated in JI’s December 2000 church bombings. In December 2001, Sufaat was arrested upon returning from Afghanistan to Malaysia where he had been serving in a Taliban medical brigade.

    Malaysian officials, at the time, long sought to minimize Sufaat’s role. Sufaat merely was a foot soldier who provided housing and false identification letters and helped obtain explosives. “I would put it this way: If Hambali [Al Qaeda’s point man in Southeast Asia] was the travel agent, Sufaat was the guy at the airport holding up the sign.” Sufaat admits to having purchased 4 tons of ammonium nitrate to build a truck bomb for the Singapore cell. The 9/11 Commission Report indicates Zacarias Moussaoui was also involved in arranging the purchase — one plan was to load the explosives on a cargo plane. The ammonium nitrate eventually was found buried throughout the grounds of a plantation. The ammonium nitrate actually had never been part of a plan by KSM — Moussaoui, eager to be involved in an attack in the region, lied to Sufaat and told him it was. When Hambali found out, he was furious and flew to Pakistan to demand (unsuccessfully) that Moussaoui be recalled. The Malaysian officials report that they believe that Sufaat had no knowledge of what the hijackers who stayed at his condominium or Zacarias were planning. That is consistent with the principles of cell security ordinarily followed — also evasion in interrogation. At a minimum, however, the established facts relevant to the Amerithrax investigation show that in the Summer and Fall of 2001 an Al Qaeda supporter who had assisted in the 9-11 operation — and who was a lab technician working with anthrax — was in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Was he the fellow perceived as Filipino who the journalist met in Afghanistan in the Fall of 2001 bragging about his ability to manipulate anthrax? According to Sufaat’s attorney, Sufaat gave two FBI agents no fresh evidence during a 30-minute interrogation finally conducted in November 2002 (where they mainly wanted to know how he knew Zacarias). The U.S. asked for his extradition in connection with hosting of the two 9/11 hijackers, but Malaysia refused. President Bush reported — and the Washington Times explains today based on the documents obtained by ACLU under FOIA — that US officials did not fully appreciate Sufaat’s role in Al Qaeda’s anthrax program until after KSM’s capture in March 2003.

    As described in US News, a former reporter from the Kabul Times actually may have met a Filipino carrying papers from Zawahiri and bragging about his ability to manipulate anthrax. The man may have been Hambali’s lieutenant, Muklis Yunos, who had been Hambali’s right-hand man and was in charge of special operations for the Philippine Moro Islamic Liberation Front (“MILF”). British reporter Philip Smucker explained that the Afghan reporter working with him spoke fluent Arabic and made regular undercover trips into Afghanistan from Pakistan. He had visited three functioning al Qaeda camps at grave risk to his life. Smucker explains that his colleague had landed in a Kabul hotel with a Filipino scientist who had a signed letter from al Qaeda’s number two, Dr. Ayman al Zawahiri, authorizing him to help the network develop biological weapons. The man at the hotel had described his own efforts to develop an “anthrax bomb.” Filipino Muklis Yunos was an explosives expert who had participated with Yazid Sufaat in the December 2000 church bombings. Upon his arrest in May 2003, Philippine intelligence said he had received anthrax training in Afghanistan. Perhaps he was who the journalist encountered.

    KSM’s Plan To Poison A Reservoir In Upstate New York

    Young Canadian Mohamed Mansour Jabarah was the courier and connection between Karachi and Kuala Lumpur. In 2002, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) delivered the former St. Catharines man to U.S. authorities, upon his written consent. St. Catherines is near Niagara Falls. He had been arrested in Oman, Jordan in June 2002, after being implicated in the plot to bomb American and Israeli embassies in Singapore. He was first taken to Brooklyn where he has been questioned by the FBI. Khalid Mohammed reports that Bin Laden was reportedly said to value Jabarah’s fluent English and his clean Canadian passport. He served as a go-between between the leaders in Karachi and operatives in Kuala Lumpur, and had a leadership role in a bombing plot there. He was let out of jail and while cooperating, lived with some FBI agents. After he learned that a childhood friend was killed in an attack on US Marines in Kuwait, he vowed to kill his captors. In a search of his room, agents found he had a plan for a steak knife that did not involve cutting his porterhouse. Authorities also found pictures of bin Laden, maps of Fort Dix, documents about New York’s drinking water supply and letters that lamented the fall of the Taliban and railed against America. The reference to New York’s drinking water supply brings to mind KSM’s plot to poison a reservoir in Upstate New York. Bloomberg explains: “He also had a U.S. Army memo describing New York City’s drinking water system, a map of the city’s water supply and testing results.”

    Jabarah spent 3 weeks living with KSM in August 2001. KSM taught him how to travel and conduct surveillance in stealth mode. Jabarah was a go-between Khalid Mohammed in Karachi and Hambali in Kuala Lumpur. He delivered the money for the bombing attacks planned for Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines. Arrested in March 2002, he had joined Al Qaeda in May 2001. In his interrogation, the Catholic-schooled youth said that KSM had asked him to “go to Malaysia to meet with individuals who were planning an operation against the US and Israeli embassies in the Philippines.” KSM told the young man that he must leave Karachi to deliver the money to Hambali, Al Qaeda’s point man in Southeast Asia and the military chief for Jemiah Islamiyah, before September 11. He flew out to deliver the money on September 10, 2001. The picture of his home in St. Catherines, Ontario, brings to mind the movie “Arlington Road” about the terrorist who lived next door. In January 2008, Jabarah was sentenced to life in prison. His father urged that since 2002, when he made those private notes about how he would seek revenge against the agents and prosecutors, and would kill until killed, he has reformed. Jabarah’s father said he had taken an interest in biology and medicine and was applying himself to his studies.

    KSM identified Majid Khan and Aafia Siddiqui as Al Qaeda operatives. KSM allegedly asked former Maryland resident Majid Khan to research contaminating a reservoir. What contaminant would have been used? Anthrax? Cyanide? Was it cyanide such as the thwarted attack against the US embassy in Rome in 2002? Some identified chemical intended to be smuggled in using the Paracha shipping container? Would the koran permit such indiscriminate murder of innocents? A recent study shows that anthrax is resistant to chlorine, but the officials typically think anthrax would be ineffective given the dilution. In February 2003, Majid Khan had met with Uzair Paracha and someone described as a “chemistry professor.” (Paracha and his father Saifullah had meetings with al-Qaeda members Majid Khan and senior operative Ammar al-Baluchi, who about that time married Aafia. In the prosecution of Uzair Paracha, the AUSA said Aafia Siddiqui was willing to participate in an anthrax attack if asked. She opened up a P.O. Box to facilitate Majid Khan’s reentry into the country. Did she know Majid Khan? What was the name of the relatives — a cousin and an uncle — that introduced Majid Khan to KSM? His father said it was a relative but more distant than “uncle.” What was the name of the “local Islamic organization” with which Majid Khan was affiliated? Was it the same party associated with Abdul Qudus Khan? The Washington Post reports that “Khan also is accused of delivering money to an operative for Jemaah Islamiyah, the Indonesian extremist group affiliated with al-Qaeda.”

    New water-surveillance systems are being tested that promise to detect biological attacks more quickly and accurately than is possible today. Ever since the anthrax mailings, the Homeland Security Department has been concerned about the risk that public water supplies will be poisoned. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Cincinnati, and Argonne National Laboratory have paired up with the Environmental Protection Agency to develop the Water Sentinel Program: software that monitors municipal water systems. It is being tested in Albuquerque. I have done a lot of testing of water as an unrelated interest. Albuquerque is an interesting choice given the high levels of arsenic there. (With arsenic, it is very difficult to get the levels down short of dilution or incurring substantial capital costs). Arsenic occurs due to naturally occurring geothermal springs. I tested a bottled water from a major soda company’s distributor in Northern Mexico that I picked up in Phoenix and it tested above the 10 ppb limit — 13 ppb and 26 ppb. The company gave me a single test showing that they tested it at 9 ppb. Its NYC law firm told me that they weren’t willing to do any further testing in the US because it would be against his client’s interest. Indeed. The FDA did nothing. The company did not notice a recall.

    Separately, the DOJ and United States Attorney even let FDA Commissioner Lester Crawford off the hook without it coming out that he resigned immediately after I told his office of a massive problem with benzene in soda. How was that a proper allocution related to his guilty plea to the misdemeanors? I had not realized he was a drinking water expert who already knew about the problem. I had asked a friend at the DOJ who had prosecuted an adulterated orange juice case for an email that would be sure to get the message to him. I wrote the FDA’s CFSAN Director the same day (on September 21, 2005, and she later acknowledged she got the email. After I wrote Wednesday afternoon, he did the right thing in resigning Friday morning given the $62,000 in Pepsi stock he owned. By just dropping an email to all employees Friday morning and walking out the building, however — and not admit why he was resigning — the benzene problem almost got swept under the rug like the arsenic problem. I stridently complained before the FDA’s Assistant General Counsel on Saturday in front of 30 witnesses at a conference in Boston on soda and childhood obesity. I asked why I had not received a response. Of course, I don’t mean to complain too much because he did resign and the FDA finally acted after I got Germany and others to act. But if the United States government is no more effective than the FDA and the state agencies in testing water, then we will just have to count on the militants appreciating that it is haram (forbidden) to poison innocents, particularly children. Similarly, if the United States Attorney is as politically-minded as he was in that case, then justice will not be served. The same US Attorney in fact had the key role in Amerithrax.

    The Mid-February 2003 Capture of Al Qaeda WMD Committee Member Mohammed Abdel-Rahman And Related Capture Of KSM

    An internal FBI document from 1999 available from intelwire.com explain that KSM:

    “In 1984 he traveled to the United States where he earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. He returned to Kuwait, and unable to find employment, left for Peshawar, Pakistan in 1989, where he joined Hisbul-Ittidhad El-Islami (Islamic Union Party), the Abdul Rasoul Sayyaf Group. In 1992, he went to Qatar and worked for the Ministry of Electricity in Doha until 1996. Pursued by U.S. authorities for his involvement with Ramzi Yousef, he traveled to to Afghanistan and joined the Islamic Union Party Leadership.” As of August 1998, he was working as an escort for Sheikh Abdul Rasoul Sayyaf, chief of the Islamic Union Party.”

    Authorities closed in on KSM in Spring 2003. When arrested, US citizen and NYC resident Uzair Paracha said he had met in February 2003 a chemistry professor who was supposed to help Al Qaeda with biological and chemical weapons. It was a big break, therefore, when the son of the imprisoned blind sheik, Abdel Rahman, was captured in Quetta, Pakistan in mid-February 2003. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman from Aghanistan spoke alongside Ali Al-Timimi at IANA conferences in 1993 and 1996. The blind sheik’s son Mohammed Abdel-Rahman had recently had been in contact with Khalid Mohammed, Al Qaeda’s #3. Two weeks after Mohammed’s capture, authorities raided microbiologist Ali Al-Timimi’s townhouse in Alexandria, VA, and searched the residence of a couple of PhD level drying experts in Idaho and Upstate NY, along with various others associated with IANA. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman then provided information that led authorities to the home of the bacteriologist that had harbored KSM. Anthrax spray drying documents were found, both on a computer and in hard copy.

    One report indicates that authorities, with the help of American communications experts, traced an email that Mohammed Abdel-Rahman had sent to an email associated with the home of bacteriologist Qadoos in Rawalpindi. Yet another report says that some unidentified Egyptian collected a $27 million reward for informing on KSM and then relocated first to Great Britain and then to the US. (Perhaps this is a different Egyptian or perhaps the intelligence officials are seeking to cause turmoil among the blind sheik’s supporters). According to Amnesty, Abdel-Rahman Jr. was “whereabouts unknown” as of 2006. He is not on the list of Gitmo detainees. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman is one of the missing prisoners whose absence from Guantanamo leads human rights researchers to believe that the CIA is still operating secret prisons. There is a possibility that he was rendered to Egypt. The US has refused to comment on where he is.

    In June 2003, a UN report explained that Al-Qaeda has a “WMD Committee,” which according to the report, “is known to have approached a number of Muslim scientists [] to assist the terrorist network with the creation and procurement of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons.” Mohammed Abdel Rahman, a member of the 3-member WMD committee, knew Ali Al-Timimi. Ali Al-Timimi conducted a summer camp at a park in Frederick, Maryland over the years. The kids liked the outdoors and ponds. Ironically, the FBI searched the park’s ponds more than once claiming that Dr. Hatfill had once suggested that someone could weaponize anthrax and discard the equipment in a pond.

    The very well-informed Pakistani journalist Zahid Hussain says in his book, Frontline Pakistan that KSM was actually captured in February from a house in Quetta — presumably the same one where Abdel-Rahman was captured. Supposedly he had been tracked for four weeks before that. Zahid Hussain says that they did not make his arrest public because they wanted to capture other al-Qaeda members or sympathizers, such as the Qadoos family. This would be consistent with the strident denials by the bacteriologist’s family that KSM was captured at their home. The timing of the raid on Al-Timimi’s house two weeks later — and the arrest of animal geneticist and experienced PhD researcher expert at mixing with silica — certainly suggests that it was connected. They had been engaged in surveillance and “trashing” and interception of targets related to the charity for many months. The investigation — including arrests, searches, and some convictions — apparently did not produce any prosecutable evidence of anyone’s involvement in Amerithrax. The timing of the February 26, 2003 raids, however, perhaps related to what Mohammed Abdel-Rahman and KSM told authorities, for example, about Aafia Siddiqui, who was connected to the blind sheik’s Al Kifah organization. An AUSA has said that Aafia was prepared to participate in an anthrax attack if asked. She opened up a mailbox in Gaithersburg, Maryland as part of operations.

    “Operation Imminent Horizon” : The Late February 2003 Raid Of Ali Al-Timimi and Other IANA-Affiliated Supporters Of Bin Laden’s Sheik al-Hawali

    In 2000, IANA announced that it had signed a cooperative agreement with the Cairo based publisher and distributor Dar Al-Manar Al-Jadeed. “Jointly they will publish in Cairo and distribute around the world the quarterly Al-Manar Al-Jadeed magazine.” The IANA website explained that the magazine was “devoted to addressing the religious, social, and civil matters. Six issues of the magazine have already been published. The editor in chief is the well-known writer, [G]amal Sultan.” Al-Manar Al-Jadeed magazine was published in Arabic and available online. In early 2001, the IANA website announced that the Help The Needy website was open. Help The Needy was its Syracuse-area based spin-off/dba run by Bassem Khafagi’s business partner Rafil Dhafir. The Cairo-based Gamal Sultan had previously written for the Pittsburgh-based Assirat Almustaqueem Magazine, which also was connected to IANA. Thus, there had been a close connection between (1) Ann Arbor, MI (2) Syracuse, NY, (3) DC-Falls Church, VA, (4) Moscow, Idaho-Pullman, Washington, (5) and Cairo, Egypt.

    On February 26, 2003, at the same time the FBI was searching the townhome of PhD candidate Ali Timimi, searches and arrests moved forward elsewhere. In Moscow, Idaho, FBI agents interviewed Nabil Albaloushi (they searched his apartment at the same time they searched the apartment of Sami al-Hussayen, who they had woken from bed at 4:00 a.m. (6:00 a.m. EST) Albaloushi was a PhD candidate expert in drying foodstuffs. His thesis in 2003 was 350 pages filled with charts of drying coefficients. “About me there is nothing suspicious,” Albaloushi told a reporter while the agents were still in his home. “I live in this country, my children were born in this country, I love this country.” In Syracuse, they arrested an animal geneticist and food researcher as a material witness.Probers exploring a possible terror connection focused on Sami Omar Al-Hussayen, a 34-year-old computer scientist and doctoral candidate who was researching cyber-intrusion techniques at the University of Idaho in Moscow. On February 25, 2003, computer expert Sami a-Hussayen’s brother in Canada, asked him about where to give a charitable contribution pursuant to Muslim religious obligations. According to an electronic intercept read into the Court record at Sami al-Hussayen’s trial. (Al-Hussayen was acquitted and other remaining charges were dropped): “There’s this organization called Help The Needy. They are IANA’s organization for the needy.” Al-Hussayen noted that the group had been around for close to a decade. As explained in a Spokesman Review trial blog, his brother noted that Help the Needy sends relief to Iraq, and asked, “Maybe they are an organization that has issues nowadays?” to which Al Hussayen answered “I don’t think so, since this is a relief organization and a registered organization. As I said, it is 9 to 10 years old and has branches in Britain and Australia.” He added, “The most important is for the organization to be clean, without any question marks on it. In addition, it was not listed on the list (of) organizations that were supporting terrorism. This is the most important thing. You don’t want to be in trouble.”

    Less than 24 hours later, Al-Hussayen was arrested, and Syracuse, NY Help The Needy’s director and three others had been jailed. In the predawn hours of February 26, 2003, in several coordinated raids, a computer graduate Al-Hussayen was arrested by FBI agents in Idaho and agents in and around Syracuse arrested three of the four suspects in the Help the Needy case. In March 2004, Hussayen was indicted on additional charges relating to support for a terrorist group by reason of being the sole administrator of a website that urged suicide attacks. He was acquitted of most charges in late Spring of 2004. The government agreed to drop the remaining charges, with the result that he would be deported rather than imprisoned. Sami al-Hussayen, an Idaho PhD student, provided funding and internet services for the Islamic Assembly of North America. From 1995 to 2002, IANA received $3 million in support from sources related to Sami al-Hussayen. Sami served on the IANA Board of Trustees. Interceptions showed a very close link between IANA’s al-Hussayen and Sheikh al-Hawali, to include the setting up of web sites, the providing of vehicles for extended communication, and telephone contact with intermediaries of Sheikh al-Hawali. Al-Hussayen had al-Hawali’s phone number upon the search of his belongings upon his arrest. IANA was characterized in a press release by the Saudi Arabian Embassy in the District of Columbia as following the beliefs of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    The Syracuse charity run by an oncologist, “Help The Needy,” was an IANA spin-off. The doctor, Rafil Dhafir, was the IANA Vice-President. The President of HTN, in name only, was Dhafir’s medical technologist. The Vice-President was Ali-Al-Timimi’s colleague and co-founder of the Society for the Adherence to the Sunnah in Washington, D.C. Al Qaeda recruiter and Bosnian fighter Sheik Abu Abdel Aziz Barbaros had spoken at the 1993, 1994 and 1995 annual IANA conferences, as did IANA lecturers Dr. Dhafir from Syracuse and Ali and Al Timimi, from Washington, D.C. Sheik Abu Abdel Aziz Barbaros from Bosnia told an interviewer in 1994 that he had first arrived in Afghanistan in 1984 and had then begun his “journey with Jihad.” The January 2000 edition of Assirat carried an editorial titled “In the Land of Ice Cream” by “Abdallah Abd’ al Aziz.” Two writers for Assirat in Pittsburgh had once shared a Portland, Oregon address with Bin Laden’s secretary Wadih El-Hage.

    The stated purpose of the”Help the Needy” charity in Syracuse, NY was to help the “starving children and muslims of Iraq.” Some years ago, two Chicago-area charities — the Global Relief Foundation and the Benevolence International Foundation — received checks totaling $42,000 from Help the Needy. Global Relief returned the favor, contributing $18,000 to Help the Needy. “Help the Needy” is not a sleeper cell, and it won’t carry out murderous attacks on the United States,” said Rita Katz, director of the SITE Institute, a counterterrorism think tank in Washington. “But its friends are capable of mounting such attacks,” she asserts. The respected Dr. Rafil Dhafir, 55, a founder of Help the Needy, was practicing in upstate Rome and has been a member of the medical staff at Rome Memorial Hospital since 1982. Osameh Al Wahaidy, 41, was a popular math professor at the State University of New York at Oswego and a Muslim prison chaplain at the Auburn Correctional Facility. Ayman Jarwan, 33, was a capable fund-raiser who served as Help the Needy’s executive director. Maher Zagha, 34, was an ex-graduate student who had attended schools in Utica and Syracuse before returning to his native Jordan where he received the bank checks from the “Help The Needy” charity. The four were accused of conspiring to violate U.S. sanctions against Iraq by transferring cash to unidentified people in Baghdad without a license. Former Washington State University animal geneticist and nutrition researcher Ismail Diab was charged and released as a material witness. After the government failed to take Dr. Diab’s deposition for nearly 3 months, the judge removed the electronic monitoring and curfew requirements.

    The charity allegedly diverted at least $4 million to Iraq, out of $5.6 million that passed through its accounts since 1995. Prosecutors said that only a small portion of the funds they could trace were used to feed Iraqis. But the indictment provides no evidence of links to terror and no suggestion the money went to Saddam or his regime. Prosecutors said they don’t know where the money went. Dr. Dhafir was jailed without bail after he talked in an email about his imagined daughter’s upcoming wedding. (The Buffalo case demonstrated that the CIA has this thing about weddings; in his defense, he would argue that code was being used to prevent Saddam’s regime from seizing relief intended for charity as it entered the country).). Authorities took away his medical license, and threw him in prison without bail. His detention without bail was the subject of protests. In mid-November 2003, 100 rallied for his freedom. His lawyer explained that to get a permit would cause the Saddam regime to seize money intended for needy muslims in Iraq.

    In March 2002, federal agents began intercepting e-mails to and from Dhafir’s home Time Warner Road Runner account under a federal search warrant. In May 2002, for the next four months, they began intercepting faxes pursuant to a warrant. Eight e-mails, most of them to or from Dhafir, provided ambiguous evidence that some of the money raised by the charity may not have gone to the charity’s stated purpose. For example, in May 2002 emails suggested that up to $50,000 had been funneled to Al Wahaidy’s family through Help the Needy accounts. In July 2002, emails indicated that other money — $500 per month — was going to other individuals in Jarwan’s family. In media reports, the individuals were described with the loaded term “operatives.” But, at bottom, the charity was doing what it said it was doing — providing money to individuals in Iraq. After intercepting the August e-mail, FBI agents rummaged through Help the Needy’s trash after it left the charity’s East Brighton Avenue office and found donation receipts from 1994, 1995 and 1996. Some donation receipts from the mid-1990s listed Islamic Assembly of North America’s tax exempt number even though the IANA was not designated a charitable organization for IRS purposes until 1999.

    In October 2002, investigators obtained a warrant to copy the contents of an envelope Dhafir mailed to himself from Egypt to the hospital at Rome. It contained two ledgers — one for the relief account and another for a private account. The ledger relating to the relief account detailed more than $3.9 million was spent from February 1996 to September 2002. Two of the people identified in the ledger and e-mails were individuals who Help the Needy had been paying — and both were in Iraq. In January 2003, investigators intercepted an overnight envelope at Kennedy International Airport in New York City that Dr. Dhafir addressed to Zagha Trading Establishment in Amman, Jordan. The packet was forwarded to postal inspectors in Syracuse for inspection. Agents got 29 search warrants in all. The e-mail search warrants had to be renewed every 30 days. But what was the crime investigated? Not having a permit to provide for the needy? That’s morally wrong but invading the country based on ambiguous or falsified evidence morally compelled? Over the last year of the investigation, there were 12 investigators from eight law enforcement agencies working full-time on the case. Clearly, investigators had to suspect that $2.73 million was going to fund terrorism rather than provide for the needy. But where’s the beef? Where’s the proof? It’s not of special moment that the funds went in a circuitous course — first going to Amman, Jordan. On February 26, 2003, 110 officers from the various agencies massed. The got their assignments the day before. The plan was to interview 150 people the same day, many of whom were donors. The massive raid coincidentally was scheduled for the Tenth Year Anniversary of the World Trade Center bombing. The agents asked the donors whether they were told their money would be going to a militant Islamic group or to help starving widows and children. They were not otherwise asked questions about their religion, the US Attorney said.

    Dhafir and Help the Needy sought to “promote a strain of Islam known as Salafism” in Iraq, the affidavit filed by an IRS agent said. Some have described Salafism as a form of Islam followed by Osama bin Laden. After the arrests, Assistant U.S. Attorney Brenda Sannes told the federal magistrate in a letter that investigators intercepted “a disturbing series of apparently coded e-mails” from Dhafir recently about “some currently unknown plan” involving someone in Iraq who had received $358,000 from Help the Needy between August 2000 and September [of 2002]. She wrote “It is not believed that these e-mails refer to relief efforts by HTN since Dhafir has communicated openly in e-mails about possibly aiding relief efforts in Iraq in the event of a war.” “There are many common threads” between the Syracuse and Idaho cases, said Terry Derden, first assistant U.S. attorney in Idaho. Michael Olmsted, one of the prosecutors in the Syracuse case, would not comment on any possible connections. Ismail Diab, arrested as a material witness, has a Ph.D. in animal genetics and worked as a nutrition researcher at Washington State University before he moved to Syracuse, the government said. (8 miles from Pullman, it has joint programs with the university there). He was released on bail.

    Among 500 pages eventually unsealed was this quote from the transcript at the hotel in Washington, D.C.

    “To us it is the issue of feeding and rescue. It is a good idea. But that’s not the major goal. Our major goal is the issue of Al-Dawah (Islamic mission work) so that people get back to the right path that makes Allah happy for their benefit in life and after life. To us that’s most important. Is the change (as a result of the expected U.S. invasions) going to allow (us) to do that? Even under the cover of charity, that’s the most important question.”

    The “Help The Needy” work sounded a lot like the President Bush’s faith-based initiative. Dhafir faced nearly three dozen counts of tax and health care fraud. The jury found him guilty in February 2005. He has top-flight appellate counsel (the briefs are online) who now estimates he has about a one-third prospect of success on appeal.

    March 2003 Arrest Of Bacteriologist Dr. Abdul Qudus Khan

    On March 1, 2003, authorities announced that Khalid Mohammed had been captured 400 miles from Quetta, in Islamabad. A walk-in to the CIA, the Egyptian said he was upset that Al Qaeda had attacked the United States. An unnamed Egyptian reportedly received $25 million for providing the information about Khalid Mohammed. (Actually, he reportedly negotiated a couple million dollars on top of that for relocation costs to Great Britain and then the United States.) Authorities said he had been in the car that drove KSM to a safe house that night. Agents quickly raced him back through the streets as he made out landmarks, leading them to KSM, who was being harbored in the home of bacteriologist Abdul Qadus Khan.

    Khalid Mohammed had hands-on responsibility for planning 9-11. Reports of the arrest described his role in various operations over the years, including the thwarted “Operation Bojinka” in the Philippines in 1995. At that time, Philippine authorities searching a seized laptop computer found a letter signed by “Khalid Shaikh Bojinka” that threatened to attack American targets “in response to the financial, political and military assistance given to the Jewish state in the occupied land of Palestine by the American government.” The letter, apparently written by Mohammed and his associates, threatened to not only attack aircraft, the principal plot underway, but threatened to launch a chemical attack if an imprisoned co-conspirator was not released from custody. Khalid Mohammed reportedly played a substantial role in trying to build Al Qaeda’s expertise in biological and chemical weapons. It turned out that he knew quite a bit about the process for weaponizing anthrax.

    The Dr. Abdul Qadoos Khan family who lived at the home where officials say they found Mohammed denies the official version of the al Qaeda arrests. The doctor ran a respected cardiology institute called Hearts International. Dr. Khan and his wife, according to early accounts, had been at a wedding in Lahore. The family reports that at 3 a.m on Saturday, a squad of around 20 officers burst into the home. At no point, according to the family, was Mohammed or any other man in the house. The agents, according to the family, did not even ask about them. Officials at Pakistan’s interior ministry, in contrast, insist that Mohammed (along with another Arab al-Qaeda member) was arrested at the same time the son, Ahmed, was detained. The bacteriologist had worked in Africa, including Sudan and Zambia. The day after the raid of the Khan’s home, authorities also detained another of the microbiologist’s sons for questioning, a major in the Pakistan Army, though he was not arrested. Pointing at a large cage of blue and green budgies on the patio, Mrs. Khan, Ahmad’s mother, said: “These are his life. Ahmed is a very simple person. He had no job, he hardly went out, just to the mosque to pray. He never traveled and his main thing was pets. He loved pets. We wouldn’t let him have a dog because we’re an Islamic family, but he loved his budgies.” Her son, she said, would watch the army dog-training center behind the house for hours. “Ahmed can’t be a terrorist,” a neighbor who was a Colonel in the Army said. “He’s a goof, simple in the head. Once he shot himself in the hand because he was cleaning a gun with the barrel against his palm.” His sister explained at the time that while the family had a computer for the children, the family did not even have the internet. Lion King and Aladdin — not terrorist plots — were on the family computer.

    Ahmed Qadoos’s mother is an activist for the ladies’ wing of Jamaat-e-Islami (JI), Pakistan’s biggest religious party. Ramzi Binalshibh, the 9/11 plotter arrested in Karachi, and Abu Zubaydah, were both found in houses belonging to JI members. Referring to the family’s denial that KSM had been at the house or was arrested, the information minister insisted: “The family is lying.” He noted that it was “perhaps unlikely” that son Ahmed Qadoos was mixed up with Al-Qaeda, suggesting the real connection was to another family member. According to one isolated but dramatic report, a few days after the raid, in another predawn raid, 20 officers went back to the Qadoos home and asked for the father. The father had not been quoted or pictured. The daughter who described the raid said his whereabouts were unknown. The Pakistan intelligence service, the ISI, confirmed he was wanted for questioning. At the first court date of the son, who later was released on bail, the son Ahmed embraced his mother and asked “How’s Daddy?” The son reportedly receives a stipend from the UN’s Farm and Agriculture Organization for having a low IQ due to lead poisoning. The international press focused on his arrest and bail rather than the charging of his microbiologist father.

    His father’s role came to be all the more important when the documents relating to the weaponization of anthrax were found on Khalid Mohammed’s laptop computer (which allegedly had been seized at the microbiologist’s home). On March 28, 2003, the father, at a hospital receiving treatment for his heart condition, was granted “pre-arrest bail,” which was confirmed the next day in court upon his arrest. Dr. Abdul Qadoos Khan, a bacteriologist with access to production materials and facilities, previously worked in Sudan for the UN’s World Health Organization. According to his family, retired in 1985 after heart bypass surgery. “His career speaks about his honesty, and he has never been involved in any clandestine activities,” his counsel successfully argued in seeking bail. Al Qaeda was based in Sudan from 1992-1996. The 78-year-old microbiologist was reported in Pakistani press to be a leader of the Jamaat-i Islami, a fundamentalist group in Pakistan. Documents in UTN’s “House of Anthrax” in Kabul indicated a connection to Jamaat-I-Islam. Jamaat is part of the United Action Council, the coalition of fundamentalist religious groups that controls the provincial government of the Northwest Frontier Province and about one-fifth of the seats in the Federal parliament. There has been no mention of the arrest of Abdul Qadoos Khan or the disposition of his legal matter since he was granted pre-arrest bail.

    Yazid Sufaat was released last December. He since has promptly disappeared. He is suspected by Pakistani intelligence of having arrived in Pakistan. Yazid Sufaat is not known to have been a member of the college sorority that has been the focus of the FBI’s Amerithrax investigation of late.

  2. DXer said

    It is unclear whether Al Qaeda’s anthrax program will get any mention in upcoming trials.

    While defense counsel Stanley Cohen is seeking to obtain testimony from KSM,

    Lawyers in Terrorism Case Seek Access to 9/11 Suspect [KSM]
    By BENJAMIN WEISER FEB. 4, 2014
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/05/nyregion/lawyers-in-terrorism-case-seek-access-to-9-11-suspect.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0

    Abu Hamza’s counsel is trying to exclude any mention of Bin Laden.

    Abu Hamza lawyers want to bar mention of Osama bin Laden and 9/11 from US terror trial
    The hate preacher hailed the al Qaeda chief and the Sept 2001 attacks in London, but his attorneys say court references would ‘deprive’ him of fair trial in New York
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/10608915/Abu-Hamza-lawyers-want-to-bar-mention-of-Osama-bin-Laden-and-911-from-US-terror-trial.html

  3. DXer said

    Terror strike plan warning ‘still valid

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/terror-strike-plan-warning-still-valid/story-e6frg6nf-1225999035003
    A 2008 warning by Canberra that Islamic terror group Jemaah Islamiah had the capacity to launch crude chemical and biological weapon attacks is just as valid today, experts say.

    Details of the terrorism alert were raised at an Australia Group meeting in Paris called to discuss proliferation concerns, and were released yesterday by whistleblower website WikiLeaks.

    The leaked US diplomatic cable notes the Australian delegation warning that while JI’s preference was for conventional weapons, the terror group “is resilient, patient and prepared to undertake organisational learning”.

    The cables reveal government fears of a worrying trend in the development of chemical and biological agents across Southeast Asia.

    “Australia noted that the region was a proliferation point for dual-use materials and technologies and potential terrorist access due to poor security,” the cable says.

    Start of sidebar.

    “One former JI operative reportedly was involved in Al Qaeda’s CBW efforts, demonstrating the ability of groups to reach out to each other extremist groups in order to acquire relevant expertise,” it adds.

    Canberra also admitted it had restricted a proposed “distance learning” university course on terrorism attacks to “government officials with a need to know”. The name of the university was not given.

    The Australian National University’s expert on proliferation, Ron Huisken, told The Australian yesterday concerns about JI’s ability to build chemical and biological weapons remained valid.

    However, Dr Huisken cautioned that making even a crude chemical or biological bomb was “not that simple” and conventional explosives would remain the terrorists’ weapon of choice.

    The diplomatic cables were classified secret and sent by the American embassy in Paris to the US State Department and other departments.

    The Australia Group was founded in 1984 by Australia after chemical weapons were used in the Iran-Iraq war.

  4. DXer said

    Excerpt from new Tom Ridge book:

    “At 7:30, I walked the few steps to the Roosevelt Room, where the morning briefing regularly drew Dr. Rice, Andy Card, Karen Hughes Karl Rove, and other key administration members, and were the conversation covered political, domestic, and international issues as well as key events scheduled for the day. As with everything else in the White House, these were concise meetings without a lot of small talk, particularly in the first days following the anthrax attacks and the new war in Afghanistan. The same was true of the meeting that routinely followed in the Oval Office.

    Mueller, Ashcroft, and I waited in the anteroom for the signal from Card to enter.”

    Note: Ali Al-Timimi, who worked alongside the leading anthrax scientist in the world and the former deputy USAMRIID commander, was the former assistant for two months for Andrew Card some years earlier.]

    “One of the significant characteristics of these meetings was the extent of the president’s involvement.”

  5. DXer said

    From Tom Ridge’s new book

    “In World War I, German agents injected it into American cattle. In the 1930s, Japan tested anthrax as a weapon in Manchuria. By the 1950s, the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union had built inventories of “weaponized” strains. There had been a proliferation since then. In 1995, Iraq admitted to having a stockpile of liquid anthrax. Later intelligence sources indicated that Al Qaeda was working on chemical and biological weapons in Tora Bora in Afghanistan.

    During one of the press conferences I conducted between October and November 2001, an exchange occurred about the “weaponization” of the anthrax used. Since the first letter surfaced a week after the 9/11 attacks, the abundant speculation about its source included foreign governments and terrorists’ laboratories. While the term “weaponization” conjured up political and scientific implications, it seemed to me that they were meaningless to the families whose loved ones had died or been hospitalized.

    Whether the anthrax spores had been separated from the nonlethal debris around them and become a purer, more highly concentrated does was irrelevant to the victims. Highly refined, or not, they had been assaulted by a biological weapon.

    Some thought Iran was at the root of the problem. Because the anthrax spores eventually discovered in our investigations had characteristics related to the military strains, many in the administration jumped to a confusion. “It must be Iraq.” Others included the Taliban as a possible culprit. No one was saying out loud there might be another Unabomber or Timothy McVeigh out there.

    ***
    When questions were directed at me, I wanted to be sure to focus on facts, not speculation, though there were plenty of facts I didn’t know. I got into a debate about the form of anthrax found in the attacks with one reporter. He pressed me on the subject of whether the powder had been ground down and refined to a high degree of weaponization. I said I didn’t think so. Even so, we were playing a semantic game. The families of the deceased victims were not wondering whether what killed their loved ones was up to military standards or not.

    ***
    The public speculation that the anthrax had become weaponized, which required grinding it very fine and adding other substances that would greatly enhance its toxicity, led to the inevitable conclusion that it would take a foreign country, rather than someone working alone, to do this.

    [Comment: Why? Dugway had used a dairy processor to make its simulant just a few months earlier]

    I guess that there were some in the administration who thought that if the anthrax attacks could be tied to extremists, it would be easier to secure support for military action in response to 9/11. However, we didn’t have the luxury to speculate and there was nothing at the time that could tie these attacks to a foreign source. It was clear to me that, regardless of the nature of the attack, America wanted and deserved the facts, pure and simple …”

    ***

    “It was in the days that followed that I learned my representation of the anthrax sent to Tom Daschle’s office had proven inaccurate. It had been weaponized.

    • DXer said

      excerpt from new Ridge book:

      “[It was] certain terrorists had experimented with anthrax on animals, but connecting those experiments to what happened in the United States, at least at this time, was fantasy.

      Credibility, of course, arises from a combination of elements. One is to be square with people when you don’t know something. Yes, I was supposed to be a counterterrorism expert in the public’s mind — after ten days on the job. I was dealing in a highly classified and sensitive environment, so I had decided that homeland security required an uncommon openness, a view that in the coming months and years would cause more than a little controversy.

      That morning, I told people what I knew and what I didn’t. I passed along information I’d received about the Daschle anthrax incident — incorrect, as it turned out — that the strain found did not consist of a particularly powerful form.”

  6. DXer said

    Let’s pick up the story of Al Qaeda’s anthrax planning with Hambali, anthrax lab tech Yazid Sufaat and the anthrax bomb maker Muklis Yunos.

    George Tenet in his May 2007 In the Center of the Storm says Sufaat was “the self-described ‘CEO’ of al-Qai’da’s anthrax program.” Tenet reports that “Sufaat had impeccable extremist credentials” and “[i]n 2000 he had been introduced to Ayman al-Zawahiri personally, by Hambali, as the man who was capable of leading al-Qai’da’s biological weapons program.”

    Participants at a key meeting in Kuala Lumpur in January 2000 included Hambali, Yazid Sufaat, two of the 9/11 hijackers, Nawaf Alhazmi and Khalid Almidhar, Cole planner Attash aka Khallad, and others. Tawfiq Bin Attash was a long time Bin Laden operative. The Yemeni first went to Afghanistan in 1989. He came to lead Bin Laden’s bodyguards and was an intermediary between Bin Laden and those who carried out the bombing of the Cole in October 2000. Attash also had been a key planner in the 1998 embassy bombings, serving as the link between the Nairobi cell and Bin Laden and Atef. Khalid Almhidhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, was from Saudi Arabia but was a Yemeni national. Almhidhar was named an unindicted co-conspirator in the indictment against Zacarias Moussaoui. Al-Hindi, who along with Jafar the Pilot would later case the NYC landmarks, had gone to Kuala Lumpur with Khallad. While not at the meeting with the hijackers, he met Hambali shortly after that meeting.

    Zacarias Moussaoui was alleged, at least initially, to have received his money from Yazid Sufaat, under the cover of a company managed by his wife named Infocus Tech. A legitimate company, the company has eight employees and virtually no connection to the US. The company was an importer of US computer software and hardware. After authorities found a letter signed by Yazid Sufaat purporting to authorize Zacarias Moussaoui as its marketing representative, authorities went looking for Sufaat. But by then, he had left for Pakistan and Afghanistan. According to his wife, he went to Pakistan in June 2001 because he wanted to do his doctorate in pathology at the University of Karachi. Dursina had attended Sacramento State with Sufaat. It was her mother who encouraged Yazid’s religious studies. According to his wife, Sejarhtul Dursina, “He had planned to set up a medical support unit in Afghanistan, near Kandahar.” Kandahar is where Al Qaeda established its anthrax lab and where extremely virulent (but unweaponized) anthrax was found at a home identified by Hambali after his capture.

    Sufaat graduated from California State University, Sacramento in 1987. He received a bachelors degree in biological sciences, concentrating on clinical laboratory technology, with a minor in chemistry. Sac State biological sciences professor Robert Metcalf taught Sufaat a food microbiology class in the spring of 1986. The first lesson in class was to teach students how German physician Robert Koch proved that anthrax was caused by a specific bacterium. “All of my students know how to isolate anthrax in soil samples,” Metcalf told the Chicago Tribune. “Anthrax was the first organism we talked about.” Sufaat joined the Malaysian army, where he was a lab technician assigned to a medical brigade. After five years, he left the service with the rank of captain and worked for a civilian laboratory. In August 1993, he set up his own company, Green Laboratory Medicine. The 9/11 Commission Report notes that Sufaat started work on the al Qaeda biological weapons program after he participated in JI’s December 2000 church bombings. In December 2001, Sufaat was arrested upon returning from Afghanistan to Malaysia where he had been serving in a Taliban medical brigade.

    Malaysian officials, at the time, long sought to minimize Sufaat’s role. Sufaat merely was a foot soldier who provided housing and false identification letters and helped obtain explosives. “I would put it this way: If Hambali [Al Qaeda’s point man in Southeast Asia] was the travel agent, Sufaat was the guy at the airport holding up the sign.” Sufaat admits to having purchased 4 tons of ammonium nitrate to build a truck bomb for the Singapore cell. The 9/11 Commission Report indicates Zacarias Moussaoui was also involved in arranging the purchase — one plan was to load the explosives on a cargo plane. The ammonium nitrate eventually was found buried throughout the grounds of a plantation. The ammonium nitrate actually had never been part of a plan by KSM — Moussaoui, eager to be involved in an attack in the region, lied to Sufaat and told him it was. When Hambali found out, he was furious and flew to Pakistan to demand (unsuccessfully) that Moussaoui be recalled. The Malaysian officials report that they believe that Sufaat had no knowledge of what the hijackers who stayed at his condominium or Zacarias were planning. That is consistent with the principles of cell security ordinarily followed — also evasion in interrogation. At a minimum, however, the established facts relevant to the Amerithrax investigation show that in the Summer and Fall of 2001 an Al Qaeda supporter who had assisted in the 9-11 operation — and who was a lab technician working with anthrax — was in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Was he the fellow perceived as Filipino who the journalist met in Afghanistan in the Fall of 2001 bragging about his ability to manipulate anthrax? According to Sufaat’s attorney, Sufaat gave two FBI agents no fresh evidence during a 30-minute interrogation finally conducted in November 2002 (where they mainly wanted to know how he knew Zacarias). The U.S. asked for his extradition in connection with hosting of the two 9/11 hijackers, but Malaysia refused. President Bush reported — and the Washington Times explains today based on the documents obtained by ACLU under FOIA — that US officials did not fully appreciate Sufaat’s role in Al Qaeda’s anthrax program until after KSM’s capture in March 2003.

    As described in US News, a former reporter from the Kabul Times actually may have met a Filipino carrying papers from Zawahiri and bragging about his ability to manipulate anthrax. The man may have been Hambali’s lieutenant, Muklis Yunos, who had been Hambali’s right-hand man and was in charge of special operations for the Philippine Moro Islamic Liberation Front (“MILF”). British reporter Philip Smucker explained that the Afghan reporter working with him spoke fluent Arabic and made regular undercover trips into Afghanistan from Pakistan. He had visited three functioning al Qaeda camps at grave risk to his life. Smucker explains that his colleague had landed in a Kabul hotel with a Filipino scientist who had a signed letter from al Qaeda’s number two, Dr. Ayman al Zawahiri, authorizing him to help the network develop biological weapons. The man at the hotel had described his own efforts to develop an “anthrax bomb.” Filipino Muklis Yunos was an explosives expert who had participated with Yazid Sufaat in the December 2000 church bombings. Upon his arrest in May 2003, Philippine intelligence said he had received anthrax training in Afghanistan. Perhaps he was who the journalist encountered.

    KSM’s Plan To Poison A Reservoir In Upstate New York

    Young Canadian Mohamed Mansour Jabarah was the courier and connection between Karachi and Kuala Lumpur. In 2002, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) delivered the former St. Catharines man to U.S. authorities, upon his written consent. St. Catherines is near Niagara Falls. He had been arrested in Oman, Jordan in June 2002, after being implicated in the plot to bomb American and Israeli embassies in Singapore. He was first taken to Brooklyn where he has been questioned by the FBI. Khalid Mohammed reports that Bin Laden was reportedly said to value Jabarah’s fluent English and his clean Canadian passport. He served as a go-between between the leaders in Karachi and operatives in Kuala Lumpur, and had a leadership role in a bombing plot there. He was let out of jail and while cooperating, lived with some FBI agents. After he learned that a childhood friend was killed in an attack on US Marines in Kuwait, he vowed to kill his captors. In a search of his room, agents found he had a plan for a steak knife that did not involve cutting his porterhouse. Authorities also found pictures of bin Laden, maps of Fort Dix, documents about New York’s drinking water supply and letters that lamented the fall of the Taliban and railed against America. The reference to New York’s drinking water supply brings to mind KSM’s plot to poison a reservoir in Upstate New York. Bloomberg explains: “He also had a U.S. Army memo describing New York City’s drinking water system, a map of the city’s water supply and testing results.”

    Jabarah spent 3 weeks living with KSM in August 2001. KSM taught him how to travel and conduct surveillance in stealth mode. Jabarah was a go-between Khalid Mohammed in Karachi and Hambali in Kuala Lumpur. He delivered the money for the bombing attacks planned for Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines. Arrested in March 2002, he had joined Al Qaeda in May 2001. In his interrogation, the Catholic-schooled youth said that KSM had asked him to “go to Malaysia to meet with individuals who were planning an operation against the US and Israeli embassies in the Philippines.” KSM told the young man that he must leave Karachi to deliver the money to Hambali, Al Qaeda’s point man in Southeast Asia and the military chief for Jemiah Islamiyah, before September 11. He flew out to deliver the money on September 10, 2001. The picture of his home in St. Catherines, Ontario, brings to mind the movie “Arlington Road” about the terrorist who lived next door. In January 2008, Jabarah was sentenced to life in prison. His father urged that since 2002, when he made those private notes about how he would seek revenge against the agents and prosecutors, and would kill until killed, he has reformed. Jabarah’s father said he had taken an interest in biology and medicine and was applying himself to his studies.

    KSM identified Majid Khan and Aafia Siddiqui as Al Qaeda operatives. KSM allegedly asked former Maryland resident Majid Khan to research contaminating a reservoir. What contaminant would have been used? Anthrax? Cyanide? Was it cyanide such as the thwarted attack against the US embassy in Rome in 2002? Some identified chemical intended to be smuggled in using the Paracha shipping container? Would the koran permit such indiscriminate murder of innocents? A recent study shows that anthrax is resistant to chlorine, but the officials typically think anthrax would be ineffective given the dilution. In February 2003, Majid Khan had met with Uzair Paracha and someone described as a “chemistry professor.” (Paracha and his father Saifullah had meetings with al-Qaeda members Majid Khan and senior operative Ammar al-Baluchi, who about that time married Aafia. In the prosecution of Uzair Paracha, the AUSA said Aafia Siddiqui was willing to participate in an anthrax attack if asked. She opened up a P.O. Box to facilitate Majid Khan’s reentry into the country. Did she know Majid Khan? What was the name of the relatives — a cousin and an uncle — that introduced Majid Khan to KSM? His father said it was a relative but more distant than “uncle.” What was the name of the “local Islamic organization” with which Majid Khan was affiliated? Was it the same party associated with Abdul Qudus Khan? The Washington Post reports that “Khan also is accused of delivering money to an operative for Jemaah Islamiyah, the Indonesian extremist group affiliated with al-Qaeda.”

    New water-surveillance systems are being tested that promise to detect biological attacks more quickly and accurately than is possible today. Ever since the anthrax mailings, the Homeland Security Department has been concerned about the risk that public water supplies will be poisoned. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Cincinnati, and Argonne National Laboratory have paired up with the Environmental Protection Agency to develop the Water Sentinel Program: software that monitors municipal water systems. It is being tested in Albuquerque. I have done a lot of testing of water as an unrelated interest. Albuquerque is an interesting choice given the high levels of arsenic there. (With arsenic, it is very difficult to get the levels down short of dilution or incurring substantial capital costs). Arsenic occurs due to naturally occurring geothermal springs. I tested a bottled water from a major soda company’s distributor in Northern Mexico that I picked up in Phoenix and it tested above the 10 ppb limit — 13 ppb and 26 ppb. The company gave me a single test showing that they tested it at 9 ppb. Its NYC law firm told me that they weren’t willing to do any further testing in the US because it would be against his client’s interest. Indeed. The FDA did nothing. The company did not notice a recall.

    Separately, the DOJ and United States Attorney even let FDA Commissioner Lester Crawford off the hook without it coming out that he resigned immediately after I told his office of a massive problem with benzene in soda. How was that a proper allocution related to his guilty plea to the misdemeanors? I had not realized he was a drinking water expert who already knew about the problem. I had asked a friend at the DOJ who had prosecuted an adulterated orange juice case for an email that would be sure to get the message to him. I wrote the FDA’s CFSAN Director the same day (on September 21, 2005, and she later acknowledged she got the email. After I wrote Wednesday afternoon, he did the right thing in resigning Friday morning given the $62,000 in Pepsi stock he owned. By just dropping an email to all employees Friday morning and walking out the building, however — and not admit why he was resigning — the benzene problem almost got swept under the rug like the arsenic problem. I stridently complained before the FDA’s Assistant General Counsel on Saturday in front of 30 witnesses at a conference in Boston on soda and childhood obesity. I asked why I had not received a response. Of course, I don’t mean to complain too much because he did resign and the FDA finally acted after I got Germany and others to act. But if the United States government is no more effective than the FDA and the state agencies in testing water, then we will just have to count on the militants appreciating that it is haram (forbidden) to poison innocents, particularly children. Similarly, if the United States Attorney is as politically-minded as he was in that case, then justice will not be served. The same US Attorney in fact had the key role in Amerithrax.

    The Mid-February 2003 Capture of Al Qaeda WMD Committee Member Mohammed Abdel-Rahman And Related Capture Of KSM

    An internal FBI document from 1999 available from intelwire.com explain that KSM:

    “In 1984 he traveled to the United States where he earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. He returned to Kuwait, and unable to find employment, left for Peshawar, Pakistan in 1989, where he joined Hisbul-Ittidhad El-Islami (Islamic Union Party), the Abdul Rasoul Sayyaf Group. In 1992, he went to Qatar and worked for the Ministry of Electricity in Doha until 1996. Pursued by U.S. authorities for his involvement with Ramzi Yousef, he traveled to to Afghanistan and joined the Islamic Union Party Leadership.” As of August 1998, he was working as an escort for Sheikh Abdul Rasoul Sayyaf, chief of the Islamic Union Party.”

    Authorities closed in on KSM in Spring 2003. When arrested, US citizen and NYC resident Uzair Paracha said he had met in February 2003 a chemistry professor who was supposed to help Al Qaeda with biological and chemical weapons. It was a big break, therefore, when the son of the imprisoned blind sheik, Abdel Rahman, was captured in Quetta, Pakistan in mid-February 2003. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman from Aghanistan spoke alongside Ali Al-Timimi at IANA conferences in 1993 and 1996. The blind sheik’s son Mohammed Abdel-Rahman had recently had been in contact with Khalid Mohammed, Al Qaeda’s #3. Two weeks after Mohammed’s capture, authorities raided microbiologist Ali Al-Timimi’s townhouse in Alexandria, VA, and searched the residence of a couple of PhD level drying experts in Idaho and Upstate NY, along with various others associated with IANA. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman then provided information that led authorities to the home of the bacteriologist that had harbored KSM. Anthrax spray drying documents were found, both on a computer and in hard copy.

    One report indicates that authorities, with the help of American communications experts, traced an email that Mohammed Abdel-Rahman had sent to an email associated with the home of bacteriologist Qadoos in Rawalpindi. Yet another report says that some unidentified Egyptian collected a $27 million reward for informing on KSM and then relocated first to Great Britain and then to the US. (Perhaps this is a different Egyptian or perhaps the intelligence officials are seeking to cause turmoil among the blind sheik’s supporters). According to Amnesty, Abdel-Rahman Jr. was “whereabouts unknown” as of 2006. He is not on the list of Gitmo detainees. Mohammed Abdel-Rahman is one of the missing prisoners whose absence from Guantanamo leads human rights researchers to believe that the CIA is still operating secret prisons. There is a possibility that he was rendered to Egypt. The US has refused to comment on where he is.

    In June 2003, a UN report explained that Al-Qaeda has a “WMD Committee,” which according to the report, “is known to have approached a number of Muslim scientists [] to assist the terrorist network with the creation and procurement of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons.” Mohammed Abdel Rahman, a member of the 3-member WMD committee, knew Ali Al-Timimi. Ali Al-Timimi conducted a summer camp at a park in Frederick, Maryland over the years. The kids liked the outdoors and ponds. Ironically, the FBI searched the park’s ponds more than once claiming that Dr. Hatfill had once suggested that someone could weaponize anthrax and discard the equipment in a pond.

    The very well-informed Pakistani journalist Zahid Hussain says in his book, Frontline Pakistan that KSM was actually captured in February from a house in Quetta — presumably the same one where Abdel-Rahman was captured. Supposedly he had been tracked for four weeks before that. Zahid Hussain says that they did not make his arrest public because they wanted to capture other al-Qaeda members or sympathizers, such as the Qadoos family. This would be consistent with the strident denials by the bacteriologist’s family that KSM was captured at their home. The timing of the raid on Al-Timimi’s house two weeks later — and the arrest of animal geneticist and experienced PhD researcher expert at mixing with silica — certainly suggests that it was connected. They had been engaged in surveillance and “trashing” and interception of targets related to the charity for many months. The investigation — including arrests, searches, and some convictions — apparently did not produce any prosecutable evidence of anyone’s involvement in Amerithrax. The timing of the February 26, 2003 raids, however, perhaps related to what Mohammed Abdel-Rahman and KSM told authorities, for example, about Aafia Siddiqui, who was connected to the blind sheik’s Al Kifah organization. An AUSA has said that Aafia was prepared to participate in an anthrax attack if asked. She opened up a mailbox in Gaithersburg, Maryland as part of operations.

    “Operation Imminent Horizon” : The Late February 2003 Raid Of Ali Al-Timimi and Other IANA-Affiliated Supporters Of Bin Laden’s Sheik al-Hawali

    In 2000, IANA announced that it had signed a cooperative agreement with the Cairo based publisher and distributor Dar Al-Manar Al-Jadeed. “Jointly they will publish in Cairo and distribute around the world the quarterly Al-Manar Al-Jadeed magazine.” The IANA website explained that the magazine was “devoted to addressing the religious, social, and civil matters. Six issues of the magazine have already been published. The editor in chief is the well-known writer, [G]amal Sultan.” Al-Manar Al-Jadeed magazine was published in Arabic and available online. In early 2001, the IANA website announced that the Help The Needy website was open. Help The Needy was its Syracuse-area based spin-off/dba run by Bassem Khafagi’s business partner Rafil Dhafir. The Cairo-based Gamal Sultan had previously written for the Pittsburgh-based Assirat Almustaqueem Magazine, which also was connected to IANA. Thus, there had been a close connection between (1) Ann Arbor, MI (2) Syracuse, NY, (3) DC-Falls Church, VA, (4) Moscow, Idaho-Pullman, Washington, (5) and Cairo, Egypt.

    On February 26, 2003, at the same time the FBI was searching the townhome of PhD candidate Ali Timimi, searches and arrests moved forward elsewhere. In Moscow, Idaho, FBI agents interviewed Nabil Albaloushi (they searched his apartment at the same time they searched the apartment of Sami al-Hussayen, who they had woken from bed at 4:00 a.m. (6:00 a.m. EST) Albaloushi was a PhD candidate expert in drying foodstuffs. His thesis in 2003 was 350 pages filled with charts of drying coefficients. “About me there is nothing suspicious,” Albaloushi told a reporter while the agents were still in his home. “I live in this country, my children were born in this country, I love this country.” In Syracuse, they arrested an animal geneticist and food researcher as a material witness.Probers exploring a possible terror connection focused on Sami Omar Al-Hussayen, a 34-year-old computer scientist and doctoral candidate who was researching cyber-intrusion techniques at the University of Idaho in Moscow. On February 25, 2003, computer expert Sami a-Hussayen’s brother in Canada, asked him about where to give a charitable contribution pursuant to Muslim religious obligations. According to an electronic intercept read into the Court record at Sami al-Hussayen’s trial. (Al-Hussayen was acquitted and other remaining charges were dropped): “There’s this organization called Help The Needy. They are IANA’s organization for the needy.” Al-Hussayen noted that the group had been around for close to a decade. As explained in a Spokesman Review trial blog, his brother noted that Help the Needy sends relief to Iraq, and asked, “Maybe they are an organization that has issues nowadays?” to which Al Hussayen answered “I don’t think so, since this is a relief organization and a registered organization. As I said, it is 9 to 10 years old and has branches in Britain and Australia.” He added, “The most important is for the organization to be clean, without any question marks on it. In addition, it was not listed on the list (of) organizations that were supporting terrorism. This is the most important thing. You don’t want to be in trouble.”

    Less than 24 hours later, Al-Hussayen was arrested, and Syracuse, NY Help The Needy’s director and three others had been jailed. In the predawn hours of February 26, 2003, in several coordinated raids, a computer graduate Al-Hussayen was arrested by FBI agents in Idaho and agents in and around Syracuse arrested three of the four suspects in the Help the Needy case. In March 2004, Hussayen was indicted on additional charges relating to support for a terrorist group by reason of being the sole administrator of a website that urged suicide attacks. He was acquitted of most charges in late Spring of 2004. The government agreed to drop the remaining charges, with the result that he would be deported rather than imprisoned. Sami al-Hussayen, an Idaho PhD student, provided funding and internet services for the Islamic Assembly of North America. From 1995 to 2002, IANA received $3 million in support from sources related to Sami al-Hussayen. Sami served on the IANA Board of Trustees. Interceptions showed a very close link between IANA’s al-Hussayen and Sheikh al-Hawali, to include the setting up of web sites, the providing of vehicles for extended communication, and telephone contact with intermediaries of Sheikh al-Hawali. Al-Hussayen had al-Hawali’s phone number upon the search of his belongings upon his arrest. IANA was characterized in a press release by the Saudi Arabian Embassy in the District of Columbia as following the beliefs of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    The Syracuse charity run by an oncologist, “Help The Needy,” was an IANA spin-off. The doctor, Rafil Dhafir, was the IANA Vice-President. The President of HTN, in name only, was Dhafir’s medical technologist. The Vice-President was Ali-Al-Timimi’s colleague and co-founder of the Society for the Adherence to the Sunnah in Washington, D.C. Al Qaeda recruiter and Bosnian fighter Sheik Abu Abdel Aziz Barbaros had spoken at the 1993, 1994 and 1995 annual IANA conferences, as did IANA lecturers Dr. Dhafir from Syracuse and Ali and Al Timimi, from Washington, D.C. Sheik Abu Abdel Aziz Barbaros from Bosnia told an interviewer in 1994 that he had first arrived in Afghanistan in 1984 and had then begun his “journey with Jihad.” The January 2000 edition of Assirat carried an editorial titled “In the Land of Ice Cream” by “Abdallah Abd’ al Aziz.” Two writers for Assirat in Pittsburgh had once shared a Portland, Oregon address with Bin Laden’s secretary Wadih El-Hage.

    The stated purpose of the”Help the Needy” charity in Syracuse, NY was to help the “starving children and muslims of Iraq.” Some years ago, two Chicago-area charities — the Global Relief Foundation and the Benevolence International Foundation — received checks totaling $42,000 from Help the Needy. Global Relief returned the favor, contributing $18,000 to Help the Needy. “Help the Needy” is not a sleeper cell, and it won’t carry out murderous attacks on the United States,” said Rita Katz, director of the SITE Institute, a counterterrorism think tank in Washington. “But its friends are capable of mounting such attacks,” she asserts. The respected Dr. Rafil Dhafir, 55, a founder of Help the Needy, was practicing in upstate Rome and has been a member of the medical staff at Rome Memorial Hospital since 1982. Osameh Al Wahaidy, 41, was a popular math professor at the State University of New York at Oswego and a Muslim prison chaplain at the Auburn Correctional Facility. Ayman Jarwan, 33, was a capable fund-raiser who served as Help the Needy’s executive director. Maher Zagha, 34, was an ex-graduate student who had attended schools in Utica and Syracuse before returning to his native Jordan where he received the bank checks from the “Help The Needy” charity. The four were accused of conspiring to violate U.S. sanctions against Iraq by transferring cash to unidentified people in Baghdad without a license. Former Washington State University animal geneticist and nutrition researcher Ismail Diab was charged and released as a material witness. After the government failed to take Dr. Diab’s deposition for nearly 3 months, the judge removed the electronic monitoring and curfew requirements.

    The charity allegedly diverted at least $4 million to Iraq, out of $5.6 million that passed through its accounts since 1995. Prosecutors said that only a small portion of the funds they could trace were used to feed Iraqis. But the indictment provides no evidence of links to terror and no suggestion the money went to Saddam or his regime. Prosecutors said they don’t know where the money went. Dr. Dhafir was jailed without bail after he talked in an email about his imagined daughter’s upcoming wedding. (The Buffalo case demonstrated that the CIA has this thing about weddings; in his defense, he would argue that code was being used to prevent Saddam’s regime from seizing relief intended for charity as it entered the country).). Authorities took away his medical license, and threw him in prison without bail. His detention without bail was the subject of protests. In mid-November 2003, 100 rallied for his freedom. His lawyer explained that to get a permit would cause the Saddam regime to seize money intended for needy muslims in Iraq.

    In March 2002, federal agents began intercepting e-mails to and from Dhafir’s home Time Warner Road Runner account under a federal search warrant. In May 2002, for the next four months, they began intercepting faxes pursuant to a warrant. Eight e-mails, most of them to or from Dhafir, provided ambiguous evidence that some of the money raised by the charity may not have gone to the charity’s stated purpose. For example, in May 2002 emails suggested that up to $50,000 had been funneled to Al Wahaidy’s family through Help the Needy accounts. In July 2002, emails indicated that other money — $500 per month — was going to other individuals in Jarwan’s family. In media reports, the individuals were described with the loaded term “operatives.” But, at bottom, the charity was doing what it said it was doing — providing money to individuals in Iraq. After intercepting the August e-mail, FBI agents rummaged through Help the Needy’s trash after it left the charity’s East Brighton Avenue office and found donation receipts from 1994, 1995 and 1996. Some donation receipts from the mid-1990s listed Islamic Assembly of North America’s tax exempt number even though the IANA was not designated a charitable organization for IRS purposes until 1999.

    In October 2002, investigators obtained a warrant to copy the contents of an envelope Dhafir mailed to himself from Egypt to the hospital at Rome. It contained two ledgers — one for the relief account and another for a private account. The ledger relating to the relief account detailed more than $3.9 million was spent from February 1996 to September 2002. Two of the people identified in the ledger and e-mails were individuals who Help the Needy had been paying — and both were in Iraq. In January 2003, investigators intercepted an overnight envelope at Kennedy International Airport in New York City that Dr. Dhafir addressed to Zagha Trading Establishment in Amman, Jordan. The packet was forwarded to postal inspectors in Syracuse for inspection. Agents got 29 search warrants in all. The e-mail search warrants had to be renewed every 30 days. But what was the crime investigated? Not having a permit to provide for the needy? That’s morally wrong but invading the country based on ambiguous or falsified evidence morally compelled? Over the last year of the investigation, there were 12 investigators from eight law enforcement agencies working full-time on the case. Clearly, investigators had to suspect that $2.73 million was going to fund terrorism rather than provide for the needy. But where’s the beef? Where’s the proof? It’s not of special moment that the funds went in a circuitous course — first going to Amman, Jordan. On February 26, 2003, 110 officers from the various agencies massed. The got their assignments the day before. The plan was to interview 150 people the same day, many of whom were donors. The massive raid coincidentally was scheduled for the Tenth Year Anniversary of the World Trade Center bombing. The agents asked the donors whether they were told their money would be going to a militant Islamic group or to help starving widows and children. They were not otherwise asked questions about their religion, the US Attorney said.

    Dhafir and Help the Needy sought to “promote a strain of Islam known as Salafism” in Iraq, the affidavit filed by an IRS agent said. Some have described Salafism as a form of Islam followed by Osama bin Laden. After the arrests, Assistant U.S. Attorney Brenda Sannes told the federal magistrate in a letter that investigators intercepted “a disturbing series of apparently coded e-mails” from Dhafir recently about “some currently unknown plan” involving someone in Iraq who had received $358,000 from Help the Needy between August 2000 and September [of 2002]. She wrote “It is not believed that these e-mails refer to relief efforts by HTN since Dhafir has communicated openly in e-mails about possibly aiding relief efforts in Iraq in the event of a war.” “There are many common threads” between the Syracuse and Idaho cases, said Terry Derden, first assistant U.S. attorney in Idaho. Michael Olmsted, one of the prosecutors in the Syracuse case, would not comment on any possible connections. Ismail Diab, arrested as a material witness, has a Ph.D. in animal genetics and worked as a nutrition researcher at Washington State University before he moved to Syracuse, the government said. (8 miles from Pullman, it has joint programs with the university there). He was released on bail.

    Among 500 pages eventually unsealed was this quote from the transcript at the hotel in Washington, D.C.

    “To us it is the issue of feeding and rescue. It is a good idea. But that’s not the major goal. Our major goal is the issue of Al-Dawah (Islamic mission work) so that people get back to the right path that makes Allah happy for their benefit in life and after life. To us that’s most important. Is the change (as a result of the expected U.S. invasions) going to allow (us) to do that? Even under the cover of charity, that’s the most important question.”

    The “Help The Needy” work sounded a lot like the President Bush’s faith-based initiative. Dhafir faced nearly three dozen counts of tax and health care fraud. The jury found him guilty in February 2005. He has top-flight appellate counsel (the briefs are online) who now estimates he has about a one-third prospect of success on appeal.

    March 2003 Arrest Of Bacteriologist Dr. Abdul Qudus Khan

    On March 1, 2003, authorities announced that Khalid Mohammed had been captured 400 miles from Quetta, in Islamabad. A walk-in to the CIA, the Egyptian said he was upset that Al Qaeda had attacked the United States. An unnamed Egyptian reportedly received $25 million for providing the information about Khalid Mohammed. (Actually, he reportedly negotiated a couple million dollars on top of that for relocation costs to Great Britain and then the United States.) Authorities said he had been in the car that drove KSM to a safe house that night. Agents quickly raced him back through the streets as he made out landmarks, leading them to KSM, who was being harbored in the home of bacteriologist Abdul Qadus Khan.

    Khalid Mohammed had hands-on responsibility for planning 9-11. Reports of the arrest described his role in various operations over the years, including the thwarted “Operation Bojinka” in the Philippines in 1995. At that time, Philippine authorities searching a seized laptop computer found a letter signed by “Khalid Shaikh Bojinka” that threatened to attack American targets “in response to the financial, political and military assistance given to the Jewish state in the occupied land of Palestine by the American government.” The letter, apparently written by Mohammed and his associates, threatened to not only attack aircraft, the principal plot underway, but threatened to launch a chemical attack if an imprisoned co-conspirator was not released from custody. Khalid Mohammed reportedly played a substantial role in trying to build Al Qaeda’s expertise in biological and chemical weapons. It turned out that he knew quite a bit about the process for weaponizing anthrax.

    The Dr. Abdul Qadoos Khan family who lived at the home where officials say they found Mohammed denies the official version of the al Qaeda arrests. The doctor ran a respected cardiology institute called Hearts International. Dr. Khan and his wife, according to early accounts, had been at a wedding in Lahore. The family reports that at 3 a.m on Saturday, a squad of around 20 officers burst into the home. At no point, according to the family, was Mohammed or any other man in the house. The agents, according to the family, did not even ask about them. Officials at Pakistan’s interior ministry, in contrast, insist that Mohammed (along with another Arab al-Qaeda member) was arrested at the same time the son, Ahmed, was detained. The bacteriologist had worked in Africa, including Sudan and Zambia. The day after the raid of the Khan’s home, authorities also detained another of the microbiologist’s sons for questioning, a major in the Pakistan Army, though he was not arrested. Pointing at a large cage of blue and green budgies on the patio, Mrs. Khan, Ahmad’s mother, said: “These are his life. Ahmed is a very simple person. He had no job, he hardly went out, just to the mosque to pray. He never traveled and his main thing was pets. He loved pets. We wouldn’t let him have a dog because we’re an Islamic family, but he loved his budgies.” Her son, she said, would watch the army dog-training center behind the house for hours. “Ahmed can’t be a terrorist,” a neighbor who was a Colonel in the Army said. “He’s a goof, simple in the head. Once he shot himself in the hand because he was cleaning a gun with the barrel against his palm.” His sister explained at the time that while the family had a computer for the children, the family did not even have the internet. Lion King and Aladdin — not terrorist plots — were on the family computer.

    Ahmed Qadoos’s mother is an activist for the ladies’ wing of Jamaat-e-Islami (JI), Pakistan’s biggest religious party. Ramzi Binalshibh, the 9/11 plotter arrested in Karachi, and Abu Zubaydah, were both found in houses belonging to JI members. Referring to the family’s denial that KSM had been at the house or was arrested, the information minister insisted: “The family is lying.” He noted that it was “perhaps unlikely” that son Ahmed Qadoos was mixed up with Al-Qaeda, suggesting the real connection was to another family member. According to one isolated but dramatic report, a few days after the raid, in another predawn raid, 20 officers went back to the Qadoos home and asked for the father. The father had not been quoted or pictured. The daughter who described the raid said his whereabouts were unknown. The Pakistan intelligence service, the ISI, confirmed he was wanted for questioning. At the first court date of the son, who later was released on bail, the son Ahmed embraced his mother and asked “How’s Daddy?” The son reportedly receives a stipend from the UN’s Farm and Agriculture Organization for having a low IQ due to lead poisoning. The international press focused on his arrest and bail rather than the charging of his microbiologist father.

    His father’s role came to be all the more important when the documents relating to the weaponization of anthrax were found on Khalid Mohammed’s laptop computer (which allegedly had been seized at the microbiologist’s home). On March 28, 2003, the father, at a hospital receiving treatment for his heart condition, was granted “pre-arrest bail,” which was confirmed the next day in court upon his arrest. Dr. Abdul Qadoos Khan, a bacteriologist with access to production materials and facilities, previously worked in Sudan for the UN’s World Health Organization. According to his family, retired in 1985 after heart bypass surgery. “His career speaks about his honesty, and he has never been involved in any clandestine activities,” his counsel successfully argued in seeking bail. Al Qaeda was based in Sudan from 1992-1996. The 78-year-old microbiologist was reported in Pakistani press to be a leader of the Jamaat-i Islami, a fundamentalist group in Pakistan. Documents in UTN’s “House of Anthrax” in Kabul indicated a connection to Jamaat-I-Islam. Jamaat is part of the United Action Council, the coalition of fundamentalist religious groups that controls the provincial government of the Northwest Frontier Province and about one-fifth of the seats in the Federal parliament. There has been no mention of the arrest of Abdul Qadoos Khan or the disposition of his legal matter since he was granted pre-arrest bail.

    Yazid Sufaat was released last December. He since has promptly disappeared. He is suspected by Pakistani intelligence of having arrived in Pakistan. Yazid Sufaat is not known to have been a member of the college sorority that has been the focus of the FBI’s Amerithrax investigation of late.

  7. DXer said

    I mean, wasn’t it obvious that Yazid was their anthrax lab person in Afghanistan long before March 2003 when KSM was waterboarded? Dating back a year earlier? Maurice is my cat. KSM perhaps figured if my cat Maurice knew it, there was no reason to continue to hold his breath.

    Al Qaeda’s California anthrax connection?/Yaziid Sufaat
    alt.california – 1 post – 1 author – Last post: Aug 24, 2002
    maurice_clay…@hotmail.com alt california 1. …. Sufaat wired $35000 to
    Zacarias Moussaoui and met with two of the other hijackers. …
    http://groups.google.com/g/6bd7fef5/t/fa55c90f32131c6c/d/6b6f7a4d3090a1ad?…

    Al Qaeda’s responsibility for the anthrax mailings
    alt.politics.org.fbi – 3 posts – 2 authors – Last post: Aug 22, 2002
    Sufaat wired $35000 to Zacarias Moussaoui and met with two of the other
    hijackers. … ing=d&selm=maurice_clayton-552E91.10254623072002%40news 25. …
    http://groups.google.com/g/4727fef7/t/f2a7c557ce59908b/…/45105de16667c077?…

  8. DXer said

    Sufaat was released last December 2008 by Malaysian authorities and in March 2009 it was reported in a Pakistan newspaper that he had gone missing. According to the news report, Pakistan intelligence reported that they believed he had come to Pakistan.

    Where are his former assistants, who in May 2007 I recalled to be named Barq and Wahdan?

    From May 2007:

    http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:8SDHGRJNCXMJ:209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1838478/posts+Barq+and+Wahdan&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

    “The assistants captured in 2003, a Sudanese and Egyptian, were both on Sufaat’s team prior to 9/11. Barq and Wahdan.”

    In Amerithrax, wasn’t it the investigative squads that were “split” — leading to confusion and faulty conclusions and analysis?

  9. DXer said

    KSM was captured in March 2003. All through 2002, I was posting on the Sacramento State alumni boards seeking information on Yazid and telling Ed on FreeRepublic and elsewhere that Sufaat, not a First Grader, was involved in anthrax planning.

    anthrax inquiry — Yazid Sufaat of Sacramento State (Class of 1987)
    sacramento.jobs – 1 post – 1 author – Last post: Jun 3, 2002
    Maurice … sacramento jobs alt true-crime alt … of
    Yazid Sufaat Graduated California State University — Sacramento in 1987 Age …
    http://groups.google.com/g/2f27fefb/t/…/d/2688f5bf330fb6ce?hl=en&ie…8

    The identity of the lab techs were Barq and Wahdan, a man from Sudan and a man from Egypt.

    If the FBI had ever sat down at my kitchen table and asked me once — just once — who was responsible for the anthrax mailings, I would have been glad to tell them.

    Maybe KSM read my essay from November 2002 and was psyched out.

    http://cryptome.org/alqaeda-anthrax.htm

    That was the purpose, after all.

    You’ll have to ask the FBI why they didn’t question Sufaat until November 2002 (and in the interim pushed forward with their Hatfill Theory).

    Maybe the day they close the case I’ll self-publish a 120 page 8 x 10 hardcover with dust jacket on blurb.com — complete with pictures and transcripts of audio.

    The CIA then can compare it with what provably has been in its files since mid-December 2001 — to include but not limited to the files of the Zawahiri Task Force.

    And we can see who at the US DOJ and CIA and FBI and USPS were responsible for the decisions they’ve made — and whether their failure to break down the compartmentalization that prevented their understanding is excusable. If you don’t have all the information, you have no business making decisions. And if you allow yourself to be used to make decisions while allowing information to be kept from you, you have no business making decisions. “I didn’t know” will not be accepted as an excuse.

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